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Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2017, Pisani was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Security Traders Association of New York for "dedication to the Association and the Industry."

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • As Art Cashin has noted, traders were not looking for ECB President Mario Draghi to reiterate how LIMITED the ECB involvement was in the crisis, they were looking for a clearer way out. They didn't get it.

  • european_union_200.jpg

    The main topic of discussion this morning was Mario Draghi's interview in the Financial Times, where he warned that any country trying to leave the euro zone would still face austerity measures and would be "in a much weaker position." He reiterated no increase in the current bond buying program, and no printing money.

  • The euro has weakened as Fitch has placed Belgium, Spain, Slovenia, Italy Ireland and Cyprus on rating watch negative, but the markets were weaker before this announcement.

  • European Central Bank

    Surfing the yield curve: Someone is buying an awful lot of European debt recently, particularly at the short end. Huh? Isn't European debt toxic? Well, sort of. But the ECB will have a new long term lending facility (up to 3 years) that will soon come into effect. This was all part of the announcement last week.

  • The data implies that business spending may begin rising — that means higher factory orders and capital goods orders.

  • S&P futures popped a few points as initial jobless claims came in at 366,000, below expectations and the lowest level since May 2008. The regional Empire Manufacturing Index was also stronger than expected for December.

  • Vanguard, the largest mutual fund company in the country by assets under management, has a large research department to help its investors. They aren't shy about weighing on issues important to those investors.

  • Europe: you can't get away from it. There's a good reason the Italian debt auction has market participants worried: the math does not add up, and there is no immediate summit on the distance that will change the math. Here's the facts...

  • The euro is having another lousy day, breaking right through $1.30 on the euro-dollar, now approaching the lows for the year that we last saw in January. The immediate cause was Italy's five year bond auction, which cost them a record 6.47 percent. They paid 6.3 percent in November.

  • Bob Pisani is off today.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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