Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • Sun shines on solar stocks again, but don't be snookered. The predictable rally in "alternative" energy stocks has begun, with the president sure to push them in his speech tonight. You'd think this would be an ideal time for solar: So why aren't traders excited?

  • The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) monthly report on builder sentiment was much weaker than expected.

  • The euro is up again, so European bourses are up for the most part. Next test will be Spain, which will auction 10 and 30 year bonds on Thursday. The UK's FTSE and France's CAC indices are both having their first five-day winning streak in nearly four months. Also: Finally, some good news for IPOs.

  • Financial regulatory reform suddenly gets very real. On a day where four stocks are advancing for every one declining, most big banks are down about 1 percent. Concerns started mounting at the end of last week that the financial reform bill would be tougher than expected. Today, FT has a front page story noting that Sen. Blanche Lincoln's proposal is now very much alive.

  • EU industrial production came in better than expected, which is helping to lift European and US stocks. Greece is up five straight days (a 9 percent rally), but other countries have seen significant gains in the last four days as well.

  • Traders began leaving the building, mentally and physically, just after noon ET Friday, but next week is one of the biggest weeks in a long time, on all fronts.

  • The US-UK spat over BP is a serious topic of discussion among traders. They are worried that this could get out of hand. They are worried that the meeting between the president and BP officials scheduled for next week will turn into another public humiliation of BP.

  • Retail sales disappoint, but some bright spots. May retail sales reports, down 1.2 percent versus consensus of 0.2 percent, were clearly a disappointment. Here's the breakdown.

  • S&P futures dropped 6 points on the disappointing U.S. May retail sales. But it was noted that building material sales were notably weak, down 9.3 percent, which may be due to the expiration of the homebuyer tax credit. Still, motor vehicle parts were down 1.7 percent, clothing sales were also down 1.3 percent. Sales up at restaurants, sporting goods, furniture. Elsewhere this week the news has been more positive...

  • What's up with Goldman Sachs? Just another indication of headline risk. Why was GS the ONLY major financial stock down today, down 3 percent to a 52-week low?

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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