Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Is $106 the breaking point for oil? First, some traders insisted $100 oil was the line in the sand: go over it, and our rally would falter. But it didn't happen: after a brief, three-week flutter, the major indices are knocking on the door of their old highs.

  • 110331_SokolBlog.jpg

    Fifteen hours after disclosing that heir apparent David Sokol would be leaving the firm (officially because he wanted to spend more time with his family, but most believe because Sokol had bought shares of Lubrizol before a deal to purchase the company was announced), there Mr. Sokol was, on Squawk Box, insisting he did nothing wrong.

  • Thoughts on commodities, financials, Europe and QE2.

  • Another broad-based rally, almost 4-1 advancing to declining stocks, nearly 200 new highs at the NYSE, as we go into the close of the first quarter.

  • Could there possibly be a bigger wall of worry than what we have now? If you would have said we would be dealing with a Japanese earthquake that has created a nuclear crisis, many Middle Eastern countries on the brink of radical political change, and continuing uncertainty about Europe's debt crisis, most traders would not have bet the S&P would be up 4.9 percent.

  • Winners_Losers_2010_bloggers_pisani.jpg

    Watch for the Middle East and Japan to hit corporate profits, China to keep the brakes on growth and governments to struggle with rising inflation.

  • The market has properly seen through what appears to be a positive earnings report from builder Lennar. The key metric, orders, were poor. Orders were down 12 percent YOY, while the backlog (future orders) were down 12 percent.

  • The rest of the world is down, commodities are down, but U.S. futures are up. Most traders are just shrugging their shoulders and attributing this to end of month trading. Also: Housing? It's not getting better.

  • Stocks drooped late in the day on some of the lightest volume of the year...this is not normally an issue, but there was an unusally large number of Market on Close Sell orders...on a light volume day, that was enough to move stocks down.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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