Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • The SEC is expected to release its preliminary report on the causes of the May 6th drop in stocks this morning. They will also likely promulgate rules on single stock circuit breakers, as well as new rules on a macro circuit breaker and specific rules on breaking trades.

  • I am expecting the SEC to issue a preliminary report on the causes of the May 6 drop today or tomorrow. Along with the preliminary report, they will separately be issuing details on individual stock circuit breakers. Sources tell me that the single stock breaker will kick in when an individual stock drops 10 percent in a 5-minute period; this will halt trading in that stock for 5 minutes across all trading platforms.

  • What will a European slowdown mean for U.S. stocks? That's the big debate on trading desks today. Those who are bullish on U.S. equities argue: not as much as you might think. Why not?

  • As has happened many days, US markets stabilized as soon as Europe closed at 11:30am ET. Regardless: it was a poor showing, despite a modest rally into the close, with 8-1 declining to advancing stocks, and more than 90 percent of the volume to the downside.

  • European markets close just off the lows for the day. Spain down 7 percent, Italy and Portugal and France down 4 percent, Germany down 3.5 percent. Europe weak all morning as the euro easily broke through $1.25, now at $1.238.

  • U.S. and European banks are both lower, for three reasons. With the exception of gold and gold stocks, commodity stocks are down 2-3 percent as energy and base metals weaken with the Euro falling below $1.25 today. And credit-card companies have their own troubles.

  • shoppers_3_200.jpg

    Retailers were weak all day after disappointing guidance from Kohl's early this morning.

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    The SEC itself will make an announcement on new rules early next week, likely Monday. At the same time, the exchanges will make a regulatory filing that will reflect the changes in their own rulebook.

  • IPO's take another shot—and fail. The entire market is repricing risk, and IPOs are showing that stress. Last week was a mess for IPOs, and that continues this week.

  • Stocks closing near highs for the day. The key story: the correlation between a weak euro/weak equities has been broken. There is now a positive correlation between the dollar (up) and the stock market (also up)—what's up with that?

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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