Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • There are three legs to the bulls' stool. For the last couple weeks, bulls have been arguing — successfully — that two legs of the stool were firming up.

  • A man in handcuffs.

    The US economy will improve, the gold bubble will pop and the US bond market will decline.

  • Will they or won't they give more to the IMF? It may be tough even if they want to. Stocks popped up midday on a Reuters headline that the U.S. may back a larger Euro financial stability package via the IMF (citing an unnamed official), which was shot down by a Dow Jones headline an hour later.

  • Trichet has made vague comments about the need to expand the European Central Bank's role in the crisis, and proposals are flying about issuing joint bonds for the entire euronation. Also helping: continuing strength in China.

  • Drug stocks have had a miserable month; the NYSE Arca Pharmaceutical Index down nearly 6 percent, far underperforming the fractional gain in the S&P 500. What gives?

  • What's more important: improving economic data or the Eurodebt worries?

  • Peter Boockvar at Miller Tabak had the most succinct comment: "If this is the reward for bailing out entire countries, why bother?...What the market is telling the European Union loud and clear is that they have no faith..."

  • Why are U.S. stocks reacting so much to the Irish news, I keep getting asked. Isn't this good news that Ireland is getting covered? My reaction is, U.S. stocks are holding up quite well, given the dollar strength.

  • The risk-off trade. The announcements over the weekend failed to put a floor under European bonds. Spanish bonds, for example, are up nearly a quarter point, to 5.40 percent on the 10-year. The market is saying Europe failed to put a firewall around Greece — then Ireland.

  • The boost to stocks as European Union officials endorsed the $115 billion debt bailout has proved short-lived. The euro has weakened, the dollar strengthened (to a 2-month high), and most major bourses in Europe are down about 1 percent after being up overnight

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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