Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.


  • Stock futures dropped on ADP bummer report. Futures were up all morning on good news from Europe, but S&P futures dropped 6 points in seconds when the ADP said only 13,000 private sector jobs were created in June, well below expectations of about 60,000 jobs. We are expecting significantly more private sector gains from the nonfarm payroll report on Friday to offset the public sector census workers that are being laid off.

  • Citigroup triggers circuit breaker, then trades back to previous trade. Shares were trading at $3.80 at about 1:03 PM ET; then, off the exchange, 8,800 shares traded at $3.31, a drop of 12.7 percent. That triggered the SEC circuit breaker...

  • How schizophrenic is the market on China? A few months ago there was great worry about an OVERHEATING China, particularly in the property sector. The Chinese central bank raised interest rates, there was concern GDP might exceed growth of 10 percent. NOW, there is concern about a slowing China.

  • The NYSE and Nasdaq are set to make filings within days that would put several hundred ETFs in the SEC's circuit breaker program, which currently includes only stocks in the S&P 500.

  • Depending on your point of view, it was either a great G20 summit or another sign of hopeless gridlock. It was a great summit if you are laissez-faire (they put off agreement on a global bank tax and did little else and dropped a 2012 deadline for stricter capital provisions); but it was also obvious how hopelessly split the leaders were, between those who wanted more spending and those who wanted less.

  • As expected, evidence of a softer sales picture in May and June (particularly for housing) is causing analysts to begin to take down earnings numbers. According to Bespoke Investment, over the last four weeks, analysts have raised estimates for 373 companies in the S&P 1500 and lowered estimates for 545.

  • The Dodd-Frank bill (that's what it's being called, folks): bad, but it could have been worse. That's what most Wall Street traders and analysts I have spoken with this morning say about the financial regulatory reform bill passed in the wee hours of the morning.

  • No boost to energy stocks from judge ruling denying the Obama administration motion to keep the drilling ban during an appeal. Why not?

  • Banks are down today on concerns that they may be on the hook for a wind-down of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Huh? Suddenly, at the final hour of negotiations on financial regulatory reform, the House appears to have included both FNM and FRE under provisions that would allow both of these companies to be wound-down in an orderly liquidation process.

  • Big battle between the deficit hawks and doves in Europe is becoming very public ahead of the G20 meeting this weekend. German Chancellor Angela Merkel is sticking to her plan to cut spending, despite criticism from George Soros. Even President Obama has warned against withdrawing stimulus too soon.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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