Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • For everyone who thinks Greece is not a factor in the market's weakness today, consider this: U.S. stocks rallied about 1pm ET as the EU's Olli Rehn, European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs, said Greece was a special case—and that Spain, Portugal and Italy would avoid a debt crisis. Why Greece again?

  • Greece, the story stock traders love to hate, is getting a lot of attention today. The talk is now changing from "the IMF is going to get involved" to "a restructuring is looking increasingly likely for bondholders."

  • The 2 year Greek bond is over 11 percent; seems like IMF bailout is inevitable. Stocks in Greece are down 3 percent; Portugal and Spain are down 3 percent. The U.S. dollar is stronger, commodities are lower. Qualcomm and eBay are both down nearly 10 percent. Then there's the IPOs...

  • Dow loses a bit of steam midday due to financials. The Dow has lost about 50 points in the past half hour (as of this writing) due to weakness in its financial components. This is likely due to concern that regulatory reform is looking increasingly real.

  • Volume is big in regional bank names as all are hitting new highs: can you say "short squeeze?" Why? I've told you about the key trends, which all banks are now reporting: 1) improving credit trends and 2) net interest margin (the spread between borrowing short from depositors and lending long to borrowers) improved last quarter. Also...

  • Traders note it's another Macro vs. Micro day ... the juggernaut of strong earnings, especially Apple and the banks versus Greece. As the EU/IMF start negotiations with Greece, the 10 year Greek bond yields are at 8.3 percent, blowing out another roughly 40 basis points.

  • After the close, Apple reported earnings and sales well above expectations: $3.33 per share (consensus was $2.45) on topline of $13.5 billion (consensus $12 billion). Guidance of $2.28 to $2.39 is well below expectations of $2.45 — that conservative guidance is typical of Apple.

  • After closing not far from the lows on Friday, the S&P 500 closed at its high yesterday and is sitting just off the highs for the day as of this writing. Volume is again trending toward the heavy side.

  • Volume picks up, but careful how you interpret the numbers. Traders have been MISERABLE, even as major indices have moved to new highs, because volatility and volume have been so low. They've been a little happier recently...

  • We opened positive on generally good corporate earnings, positive economic data in Europe and opening above the psychologically important 1200 level for the S&P 500. Even thought the Dow is relatively flat, there are THREE stocks advancing for every ONE declining...

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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