Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • U.S. may lose Aaa rating? Traders passing around comments that were made about 2:30pm ET by Moody's. Commenting on the U.S. government budget that was presented yesterday, Moody's called it a "small start to the big task of returning to a sustainable debt trajectory," and then went on to say...

  • A rather strange two days...the mantra all through January was, SELL THE EARNINGS...good or bad, sell the earnings. Now, in the first two days of February, companies that beat earnings are trading UP and staying UP. One thing’s for sure: there’s more going on than just the start of a new month.

  • Stocks rallied mid-morning on pending home sales in line, dollar weakness, Mr. Geithner speaking like a fiscal conservative—but most point to earnings commentary as the main factor for the rally. Three items stand out...

  • Mining and metal stocks are up again about 2 percent in Europe; Rio Tinto was raised to "buy" from "hold" at Citigroup. We have no panic over Greek bonds, so Europe is trading higher. Elsewhere, earnings are pumping up stocks — mostly outside the U.S., but not all...

  • Good news: oil production (upstream) showed production growth. This is a remarkable achievement! The bad news: 1) access to resources; 2) downstream (oil refining) is a mess.

  • Although global economies appear to be recovering, the inevitability of higher interest rates still weighs on stocks. Manufacturing indexes were strong in India, China, South Korea and Australia. Australia may raise rates again tomorrow, by 25 basis points to 4 percent. The U.S. reports on its own manufacturing activity with the ISM at 10am ET.

  • Earnings good this morning, so why are stocks down? Once again, events on the other side of the pond are capturing trader attention.

  • S&P futures were up about 3 points on: 1) President Obama's call for tax cuts and tax credits for small businesses, a focus on jobs and his statement that he is "not interested in punishing banks," 2) Ben Bernanke's likely survival of a procedural vote in the Senate, and 3) earnings beats from Ford, P&G, Motorola, Nokia, Lockheed Martin and Colgate.

  • Lots of market moving events today: the Apple show, President Obama's State of the Union speech, conclusion of the FOMC meeting, the Geithner hearings. Traders are hopeful the President will focus on the economy and job creation, and tone down the populism. Traders are less optimistic that anything good will come from The Geithner Witch Hunt, as some are calling the hearings...

  • Stocks today: neither Geithner, nor Steve Jobs, nor Bernanke move the needle much. FOMC Statement: basically the same, but a slight upgrade to economic outlook, and a Hoenig dissent. The Apple iPad...good stuff, but AT&T provider a bummer.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Wall Street