Crime Bribery

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  • FIFA President Joseph Sepp Blatter

    Sepp Blatter insisted he cannot be responsible for keeping corruption from happening and said he should be re-elected as FIFA president.

  • President of International governing body of association football FIFA Sepp Blatter.

    "They corrupted the business of worldwide soccer," AG Loretta Lynch said of FIFA officials charged in a 46-count indictment.

  • Turmoil at Petrobras

    Roughly 50 people have been arrested or charged in the Petrobras bribery scandal, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera.

  • Alstom to pay $772 million in bribery settlement: Report

    The Justice Department is expected to announce Alstom will plead guilty and pay $772 million in a bribery settlement, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers.

  • Alstom to settle bribery charge: Report

    Alstom is close to settling a bribery charge for more than $500 million with the U.S. Justice Department, reports CNBC's Dominic Chu.

  • corporate bribes, bribery, corporate corruption

    Bribery is alive and well in the developed world, as completion for contracts remains fierce among large global companies.

  • The 124 largest publicly traded companies are opaque, with few fully revealing their holdings or anti-corruption steps, Transparency International said.

  • Sex tape adds fire to GSK China scandal

    The Chinese corruption scandal at GlaxoSmithKline was complicated by the revelation that a sex tape involving the company's top boss in China was sent to senior executives not long before the government opened its investigation into the alleged bribery of doctors.

  • Elon Musk questions Air Force ethics

    SpaceX CEO Elon Musk questions how the Air Force awarded rocket contracts to a competitor. CNBC's Eamon Javers reports.

  • GSK executives charged with bribery: Report

    Chinese police have charged GlaxoSmithKline executives who have been under investigation for allegedly bribing doctors and Chinese officials, reports CNBC's Eunice Yoon.

  • GSK China head faces bribery allegations

    CNBC's Eunice Yoon reports Chinese police say the former China head of drugmaker GlaxoSmithKine ordered employees to commit bribery, generating billions of dollars in illegal revenue.

  • An employee of British drug firm GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) enters their office headquarters in Shanghai.

    Chinese police on Wednesday said they had charged the British former China head of drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline and other colleagues with corruption, after a 10- month probe found they paid billions of yuan in bribes to doctors and hospitals.

  • The funds were seized from the sale of a house purchased in 2005 that U.S. prosecutors say are traceable to corruption during the reign of South Korea's former President Chun Doo-hwan.

  • Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin.

    Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was convicted Wednesday on charges that he accepted bribes, free trips and other gratuities from contractors.

  • Alcoa pays $384 million to settle bribery cases

    CNBC's Morgan Brennan reports Alcoa will pay $384 million to settle bribery cases with the SEC & DOJ. Alcoa is charged with violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

  • Wal-Mart shakeup, not totally unexpected: Pro

    Stacey Widlitz, CNBC retail analyst, and Chris Horvers, JPMorgan retail-hardlines analyst, weigh in on Wal-Mart Mike Duke's successor Doug McMillon as new CEO.

  • Qatar World Cup bribery claims examined

    Mel Goldberg, senior partner at Mel Goldberg Law, discusses FIFA's investigation on corruption and bribery claims regarding Qatar's successful bid to host the World Cup in 2022.

  • Authorities are investigating British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline for violations of US anti-bribery laws in China after Chinese government officials accused the company of bribing doctors.

  • The U.K.'s Serious Organised Crime Agency (Soca) has been ordered to make public a list of over 100 companies and individuals who hired corrupt private detectives. A government committee warned Soca that if it did publish the list by Monday, it would be forced to do so instead.

  • An internal exam of JPMorgan's hiring practices in Asia is looking at the employment of about 200 people for possible instances of illegal nepotism, a source said.