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  • Mossberg & Swisher launch 'Re/code'

    Tech veterans Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg of Revere Digital discuss the launch of "Re/code," a reincarnation of "All Things D." Re/code also signed a content agreement with NBC News group to partner on technology coverage.

  • Breaking the digital ceiling

    CNBC's Jon Fortt reports on the comments made by computer programmer Paul Graham of Y Combinator about women in technology and solutions to get more women interested in coding.

  • Reality of activist investors

    Is the media enabling activist investors? BuzzFeed business reporter Matthew Zeitlin, and the "Squawk Box" panel share their opinions.

  • Which console wins?

    Discussing which video game console won the holiday shopping season, with Daniel Ives, FBR Capital Markets, and Colin Sebastian, Robert W. Baird.

  • Console War: Sony vs. Microsoft

    CNBC' Josh Lipton reports Sony appears to have the edge over Microsoft in the "console war."

  • UPS should focus on operations: Pro

    Eric Dezenhall, crisis management consultant for Dezenhall Resources, says UPS should focus on operations for next year, not apologies.

  • Gartman: Huge crop of women to be appointed to boards

    CNBC's Josh Lipton reports on the lack of diversity among Silicon Valley board rooms. The "Closing Bell" panel weighs in.

  • Year of the pushback for boards?

    CNBC's Mary Thompson and Josh Lipton look back on activist investing in 2013, and whether boards will face more "agitators" next year.

  • 'Game-changing technology' for ice hockey: Bauer CEO

    Bauer's new line of ice hockey skates uses a system called "OD1n." Its CEO Kevin Davis discusses the new equipment, as well as the new body suit. "

  • FedEx Q2 results shy of expectations

    Scott Schneeberger, Oppenheimer senior analyst, breaks down the shipping company's second quarter results, and explains why he likes the long-term outlook on FedEx. The company is nicely on pace and presents a buying opportunity, says Schneeberger.

  • Cautious over Facebook's execution: Analyst

    Shares of Facebook have nearly doubled this year. Victor Anthony, Topeka Capital senior analyst, and Ben Schachter, Macquarie Research analyst, debate the company's potential for 2014.

  • Raiding Amazon's 'Pantry'

    The e-commerce giant's buy-in-bulk delivery service will likely give big box retailers Costco and Sam's Club a run for their money. CNBC's Jon Fortt, and Alistair Barr, USA Today, weigh in on Amazon's plans to expand its empire. It's all about getting consumers to spend more money, Barr says.

  • Food fight: Inside Amazon's 'Pantry'

    The internet giant is working on an online whole sale business that would compete with bulk-buying companies like Costco and Sam's Club, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • Not in internet bubble; small companies transitioning: Laffont

    CNBC's David Faber speaks with Philippe Laffont, Coatue Management founder and CIO at the Robin Hood Foundation's investors' conference, about whether we're seeing another internet bubble.

  • Retailers compete ahead of holiday

    Discounts for retailers are a necessary evil to win sales and traffic during the holiday season, explains CNBC's Courtney Reagan. A look at how the retailers are competing this season.

  • KMB pursuing spin-off

    Tom Falk, Kimberly-Clark Chairman and CEO, discusses why his company originally got into the health care business, and why it's looking at spinning off its health care business.

  • Bethune on mega merger: DOJ suit 'all bark'

    Former Continental Airlines Chairman & CEO Gordon Bethune says he was "absolutely" surprised the DOJ went after the AMR Corp. and U.S. Airways merger.

  • Should anyone own parts of the moon?

    CNBC's Jane Wells spoke to Robert Bigelow of Bigelow Aerospace about owning parts of the moon, and how worried he is about China. "No one should own the moon, but multiple entities should have opportunity to own the moon," said Bigelow.

  • Risk vs. reward of settlement

    CNBC's Andrew Sorkin and IAC Chairman Barry Diller talk about the risk verses the reward of a settlement. Diller says it is better to give in than to be taken hostage and pay a huge fine.

  • Barry Diller: The idea of settlement is a bad concept

    CNBC's Andrew Sorkin and IAC Chairman Barry Diller discuss the heavy fines levied against SAC and JPM. Diller says there is no point in taking money from shareholders and giving it to the government.