Business Strategy Business Competition

  • Apple to go faster and cheaper?

    Walter Piecyk, BTIG analyst, and Glen Yeung, Citigroup analyst, provide a preview of Tuesday's big Apple product event, and discuss the likelihood the tech giant will unveil two new iPhones.

  • Serious Dough

    From Hooters girl to the C-suite, Cinnabon President Kat Cole has shot to the top of the franchise business thanks to her smarts and drive. Cole, who oversees 1,100 locations globally and $1 billion in revenue, shares her recipe for sweet success.

  •  US moving back up the competitiveness rankings

    Jennifer Blanke, senior economist at the World Economic Forum, tells CNBC that the US has crept back up the world competitiveness rankings.

  • Not so sweet Krispy Kreme quarter

    James Morgan, Krispy Kreme chairman and CEO, breaks down his company's second quarter earnings and provides insight on whether the he would consider adding the 'cronut' to the menu.

  • Apple launches new program for old iPhones

    Apple is kicking off an iPhone trade-in program at select stores today, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt. And Scott Kessler, S&P Capital IQ, weighs in on how the new program will impact competition and iPhone 5 sales.

  • Williams-Sonoma lower despite Q2 beat

    Laura Champine, Canaccord Genuity analyst, provides her outlook on Williams-Sonoma amid growing competition between high-end specialty retailers like Restoration Hardware and Bed, Bath & Beyond.

  • Baby steps to putting a smartphone on your face

    Mark Spoonauer, Laptop Magazine, and Ina Fried, All Things Digital, discuss Samsung's launch of the Galaxy Gear smartwatch, and weigh in on the growing competition in wearable technology.

  • What's Apple's e-book endgame?

    Daniel Ernst, Hudson Square Research, provides perspective on Apple's battle with the government over allegations the company conspired to raise e-book prices.

  • Video game season kicks off today

    Jonathan Geller, BGR president and editor-in-chief, provides an outlook on the top players in mobile gaming and the next generation of gaming consoles.

  • VMware's land grab

    CNBC's Jon Fortt report competition is getting fierce in the cloud service space.

  • Kayak launches new feature

    Kayak co-founder and CEO Steve Hafner discusses competition among travel websites.

  • Pandora CFO on mobile growth strategy

    CNBC's Julia Boorsitn talks with Mike Herring, Pandora CFO, about his thoughts on yesterday's flash freeze at the Nasdaq, and his plans to compete with Apple's iTunes Radio.

  • Hard to believe HPQ's turnaround story: Pro

    Jim Suva, Citi analyst, examines Hewlett-Packard's Q3 results and provides perspective on the future of the computer maker, including changes in leadership and strategy.

  • 'Got to run the US like a business': Lemonis

    "The Profit" with Marcus Lemonis airs tonight on CNBC at 10p EP/PT. Lemonis answers how he would fix the American government.

  • Postmaster General: We don't want a bailout

    The postal service lost $16 billion in 2012; and a group of 87 federal judges wrote a letter to Congress complaining about the sequester. GOP strategist Noelle Nikpour, and Blake Zeff of Salon.com, provide perspective.

  • Sin city hot for startups?

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin provides some analysis on how the "Silicon strip" matches up against other U.S cities. Zappos CEO is betting big on Las Vegas.

  • Made in America

    Mom and pops are making a comeback, as are large corporations. CNBC's Eamon Javers investigates what politicians and corporations are getting out of their on-shoring efforts.

  • Crossbar: Disrupting flash memory

    George Minassian, Crossbar co-founder & CEO, explains how his company is raising the bar on storage and improving mobile computing.

  • Micron stock soars on need for more memory

    The semiconductor's stock is up 100-percent in the last year. Mark Durcan, Micron Technology CEO, explains how the need for more memory has made his company one of the top players in the sector.

  • United States of imports

    Without imports, a lot of American businesses and the American workforce, could be caught "like fish out of water," reports CNBC's Courtney Reagan.