Asia Top News and Analysis China

  • China PMI Reveals Slow Recovery: Pro

    Klaus Baader, Chief Economist, Asia Pacific, Société Générale says investors should maintain a cautious outlook for China as its pace of recovery is slowing.

  • Still See Pockets of Growth In Emerging Asia: Pro

    Taimur Baig, Director & Chief Economist of Global Markets Research at Deutsche Bank, says Asia still has pockets of strong growth despite global regulatory uncertainty.

  • Commodities Tomorrow: Nat Gas Up

    CNBC's Bertha Coombs looks at natural gas, which had a good day after the EIA announced a larger drawdown than expected. Fund managers continued to move out of commodities and into stocks, she says.

  • Guessing the number of billionaires in the world (or even in a single country) is just that -- a guessing game. But it's a highly profitable and increasingly popular one.

  • If you were busy watching the euro tank and the yen soar, you may have missed a bigger currency story: The dollar, some experts said, is poised for significant strengthening.

  • A soldier mans his post in front of the Ministry of National Defense in Beijing.

    Two Chinese military websites were subject to about 144,000 hacking attacks a month last year, almost two-thirds of which came from the US, China said.

  • China Vanke, the country's biggest real estate developer, said it's looking to extend its foreign investment drive beyond the high-end U.S. market, as Beijing weighs new measures to cool mainland property prices.

  • STOXX: Why China Needs Another Index ETF

    Global index provider STOXX is licensing an index in China for the first time. CEO Hartmut Graf tells CNBC about the launch of its mainland-based ETF in Shanghai earlier this week.

  • Reports linking the Chinese military to scores of hacking attacks on US businesses was deeply troubling and completely unsurprising if we judge by Washington's reaction to the news.

  • An Italian bond sale weighs on the euro and a credit rating affirmation lifts the Aussie - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • French Tire Workers Protest  Against Closure

    Workers at a dying French tire factory who have become the butt of American jokes staged a last-ditch protest to save their jobs.

  • Commodities Tomorrow: Oil Outlook

    With U.S. oil prices at the lowest levels of the year, traders are looking ahead to the U.S. Energy Department's weekly gauge of oil inventories on Wednesday. CNBC's Sharon Epperson reports that analysts are expecting crude supplies to have risen by 2.6 million barrels in the past week.

  • European Fears Mount in US Markets

    Stephen Roach, Yale University senior fellow; and Jason Trennert, Strategas Research Partners, provide an outlook on U.S. markets, amid election uncertainty in Italy and discuss what lawmakers need to do to achieve a balanced budget with compromise in the U.S.

  • People's Bank of China in Beijing, China

    China's money rates jumped on Tuesday after the central bank continued to drain funds from the market, sparking uncertainties about regulators' intentions toward the interbank market.

  • China is the big story - the second biggest economy in the world and on its way to become the biggest (according to one way of measuring it, at least). So it's only natural that foreign exchange traders should want to get in on this Next Big Thing.

  • Restoring Yum's Image in China

    Yum Brands Vice Chairman Sam Su told CNBC's Eunice Yoon China remains their best market despite the food scare, and plans to continue to focus on growth there.

  • No Sweetheart Deal For Hong Kong: CLP CEO

    Andrew Brandler, CEO of power supply firm CLP, discusses the company's full-year earnings and warns of rising challenges in its Australian and Indian operations.

  • Commodities Tomorrow: Eyes on Iran

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets, where a rising dollar hit oil today. Traders continue to watch Iran, what's happening in Europe, and look ahead to Ben Bernanke's testimony tomorrow. And investors leave gold ETFs.

  • An omission by the Obama administration last week underscored the U.S.'s heightened sensitivities over how directly to confront China's new leadership over hacking.

  • Cyberattacks are happening and are a serious threat, but companies may not want to reveal them for fears of liability and brand damage.