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    Greece bites the bullet and currency investors get busy. Time for your Thursday FX Fix.

  • Nanjing street shopping district.

    All is not well in China and the interbank market in the country is sending baffling signals, according to First Global Chief Strategist Devina Mehra.

  • wind_turbines5_200.jpg

    High oil prices and concerns over the safety of nuclear power following the Fukushima crisis in Japan are reigniting interest in renewable energy, with wind power likely to be a major beneficiary, Tulsi Tanti, chairman of Suzlon Group, told CNBC.

  • Apartments in China

    The recent slew of credit tightening measures and higher downpayment requirements for home buyers in China have begun to slow the country's red hot property market and that could lead to more small- and mid-cap Chinese property developers being taken private, presenting an opportunity for investors, according to Daiwa Capital Markets.

  • Apartment buildings in Liaoning Province, China.

    China's annual property inflation eased to 4.2 percent in May, extending a slowdown in recent months after a series of heavy-handed tightening measures by the government to cool price rises and deflate a bubble.

  • JPM's China Head on Undervalued Stocks

    Jing Ulrich, JPMorgan chairman of global markets, China, says Chinese stock valuations are well below average.

  • The “Mad Money” host explains why he thinks stocks climbed higher Tuesday.

  • Private Equity Risk

    According to a new index of sovereign risk just released by BlackRock, Norway is the least risky nation on the planet. Read on to find out which other nations round out the Top 5.

  • Markl Mobius, Executive Chairman of Templeton Emerging Markets

    "It is not unrealistic for China to backstop the euro zone crisis," said Mark Mobius, the executive chairman of Templeton Emerging Markets Group in an interview with CNBC on Tuesday from Monaco.

  • Mutual Funds

    When the going gets tough, the tough...err... head to Monaco. The world's largest fund managers headed to Monaco Tuesday to discuss the issues closest to their hearts.

  • Hong Kong Dollar bills featuring an image of the Bank of China Building. There are growing calls for an end to the peg with the U.S. dollar.

    Worries about inflation and slowing economic growth make the once-hot group unattractive.

  • fx_fix_1_200.jpg

    Risk-off investors are buying dollars but souring on kiwis.

  • Wen Jiabao

    The Chinese economy reflects the ‘Vampire Economy’ of Germany under National Socialism, Sean Corrigan, chief investment strategist at Diapason Commodities Management told CNBC.

  • The new Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental lands at Le Bourget airport near Paris.

    Indian airlines walked away from the Paris Air Show with a third of the airplane orders last week — a $23 billion gamble that air will finally conquer rail despite a formidable list ofobstacles. 

  • The "Mad Money" host reveals which companies' earnings reports are important to monitor.

  • Google Search

    Google continues to be a great buy despite the stock being off its highs, Brent Wilsey told CNBC Friday. Also: Yu-dee Chang, ACE Investment Strategists' chief trader, weighs in on oil stocks.

  • Wen Jiabao

    China's premier Wen Jiabao arrived in Hungary on Friday as part of a five-day tour of Europe that analysts expect will see the Chinese government attempt to reassure markets over its economic management and lend rhetorical support to Europe's economies.

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    The dollar rides some good economic news, for a change, and the Bank of England's Mervyn King delivers a scolding — time for your FX Fix.

  • Prada Lacks Strong Brand Loyalty in China: Analyst

    Italian fashion house Prada posted small gains on its trading debut in Hong Kong on Friday, and one analyst says he wouldn’t buy its shares right now because the retailer simply doesn’t have the same level of recognition in China as other luxury brands. 

  • China's Hottest Tech Stocks

    Discussing the rough time Internet company Youko, which is known as the YouTube of China, has had during the past three months as well as a strategy to turn the stock around, with Victor Koo, Youku chairman.