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Sports Business College Basketball

  • James Southerland #43 of the Syracuse Orange celebrates with his teammates after a point against the UNC Asheville Bulldogs during the second round of the 2012 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament.

    March Madness can be the bane of an employer's existence as employees research their brackets and sneak scores at work in between spreadsheets. But if you're a boss, think twice before you go making a big crackdown: The madness could actually be good for productivity!

  • NCAA's Moneyball

    CNBC's Darren Rovell has the stats on the millions of Americans expected to tune in on March Madness.

  • The NCAA makes it a taboo subject because players don’t get paid royalties for their jerseys. Their excuse? The players’ names are not on the back. But every year, schools give manufacturers specific numbers that correlate to the best players on their team. So we went to the folks at Fanatics, the leading retailer of college merchandise online, and asked them what schools with what numbers sold best this year.

    We went to the folks at Fanatics, the leading retailer of college merchandise online, and asked them what schools with what numbers sold best this season.

  • Head coach Mark Gottfried of the North Carolina State Wolfpack.

    There are some nice bonuses for coaches whose teams make the NCAA Tournament. Many of them make a standard $25,000 to $30,000 for reaching the Big Dance. But NC State’s Mark Gottfried has a bonus for making the tournament that rivals a championship bonus.

  • John 'Big Nut' Peters, fan of the Ohio State Buckeyes, holds up a sign which reads 'March Madness' against the Michigan State Spartans during the Final Game of the 2012 Big Ten Men's Conference Basketball Tournament.

    With the NCAA men's basketball tournament field finally set, it's time to break down the bracket in our own unique way.

  • John Shurna #24 of the Northwestern Wildcats attempts to control the ball against Andre Ingram #30 of the Minnesota Golden Gophers during their first round game of 2012 Big Ten Men's Basketball Conferene Tournament.

    It’s not easy being purple. There’s nothing I can take to numb the pain I feel this morning. Not Tylenol, not Aleve, not even a couple beers later on can temporarily lift the ache I feel in my heart.

  • Marinatto Celebrates Big East Conference

    John Marinatto, Big East commissioner, discusses the Big East kick-off at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday and how the conference plans to stay relevant after some big name defections, like Syracuse and Pittsburgh.

  • Jeremy Lin Big Heads

    For years, fans have held mini heads of players on a stick. I remember holding one myself in 1999 of our best player Evan Eschmeyer while I was at Northwestern.

  • When not many people believed in Jeremy Lin, there was Roger Montgomery. The sports agent, whose only other NBA client is Mo Evans, who plays for the Washington Wizards, traveled to Harvard during Lin's senior year on the belief that one day Lin would be an every-day NBA player.

  • Sometimes the spectators at sporting events can draw as much attention as the players. It’s now common to find celebrity sports fans in the spotlight during telecasts of their favorite teams.These avid and loyal fans spend big bucks to sit up close – often in the first row. Take "Sopranos" actor Steve Schirripa , a longtime New York Yankees baseball fan who likes to sit behind home plate, where tickets cost up to $2,500a game. Or “Fantastic Four” star Jessica Alba, who often sits courtside at Go

    Who are these die-hard celebrity sports fans? Find out who made our list and how much just one of their tickets might cost.

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    Tom Brady and Tim Tebow are plenty marketable. But the two quarterbacks have two prominent deals that aren't exactly in slam-dunk endorsement categories: men's shoes and underwear.

  • Cryon-X machine

    In November, Cleveland Cavaliers guard Manny Harris got into a Cryon-X machine on Nike’s campus in Beaverton, Ore. When he came out, he had a nasty freezer burn on the side of his right foot. The machine is the new age version of an ice bath and is the latest in athlete recovery methods. In just three minutes, the company that makes it, Millennium ICE, says the machine cranks the temperature inside to minus 166 degrees Fahrenheit, thus oxygenating the blood, helping to reduce fatigue and muscle soreness.

  • Direct TV Auto

    For $3,995, Firestone's company will provide you with the equipment -- a dish and receiver -- and DirecTV is only $6 more a month if you are already a DirecTV spacersubscriber. The programming you get in your car mirrors what you get in your house.

  • Chris Paul

    On Thursday night, word swirled around the Twitterverse that Chris Paul could be on his way to the Lakers in a trade with the Rockets and the Hornets. At best, the Hornets get a couple of starters and a draft pick. At worst? An all out PR disaster for the league within minutes of ratifying its 10-year Collective Bargaining Agreement with the players.

  • Jason Kidd #2 of the Dallas Mavericks drives against LeBron James #6 of the Miami Heat in Game Six of the 2011 NBA Finals.

    Basketball's  labor-management battle costs dearly, Nike puts its stamp on the NFL merchandizing and a sponsorship goes to a new level.

  • Jim Boeheim

    Whether Syracuse men's basketball coach Jim Boeheim is fired or not, is anyone's guess. Just know this: He has said enough to be fired.

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    It’s been a tough year for Mike Peduto, one of the owners of Circle City Tickets, the largest sports ticket brokerage in Indianapolis. Demand has waned for Indiana Hoosiers basketball tickets. There’s virtually no demand for the Indiana Pacers on the secondary market. And then, the good old reliable Colts are off to an 0-7 start.

  • Tom Cruise as Jerry Maguire

    Last night, 60 Minutes aired a piece on superagent Drew Rosenhaus and mentioned that he was the main inspiration for "Jerry Maguire." The film's director Cameron Crowe chimed in after I suggested it was modeled more after agent Leigh Steinberg than Drew.

  • Court Grip

    Basketball players have palmed their shoes for years, hoping to solve the age-old problem of slipping on the court. It seems like no product has helped and evolving shoe technology couldn't solve the problem either.

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    The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association has released its extensive study on team sports in America, arrived at by conducting more than 38,000 interviews earlier this year. Here are some of the most interesting facts.