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College Colleges & Universities

  • Moving in with mom & dad

    More millennials are moving back in with their parents. But those most likely to return to the coop aren't college-educated kids looking for jobs.

  • Power Rundown: Surge in part-timers

    President Obama is planning to tame rising college costs; and it's not so difficult to find a job if you're looking for part-time work. CNBC's Bob Pisani and Simon Hobbs, discuss.

  • Obama's education plan

    President Obama will reveal his push to bring college costs down, reports CNBC's John Harwood.

  • Should Princeton pay taxes?

    An op-ed in today's WSJ poses the question "why shouldn't Princeton pay taxes?" Syndicated radio host Dennis Prager, and Curtis Dubay, Heritage Foundation, share their opinions.

  • 2U takes grad degree digital

    Chip Paucek, CEO of 2U, explains how he plans to revolutionize the education system by forming digital platform partnerships with major universities like Georgetown and Berkeley.

  • Student loans killing startups?

    Is student loan debt killing the entrepreneurial spirit? Carol Roth, author of "The Entrepreneur Equation," and Andrew Busch, The Busch Update, discuss.

  • Oregon's secret weapon

    CNBC's Jane Wells offers a look inside Eugene, Oregon's brand new state of the art football facility at the University of Oregon.

  • Wells speaks to University of Oregon's mascot

    The University of Oregon hopes its new multi-million dollar training facility will bring it football greatness. Jane Wells talks to the most famous member of the team--the mascot, famous for doing pushups every time the team scores a touchdown.

  • Back-to-school season goes high tech

    As students prepare to head back into the classroom, electronic devices are topping the list for many buyers, reports CNBC's Courtney Reagan.

  • Market check ahead of the Fed

    The Kentucky college has received one of the biggest school endowment gifts in U.S. history, reports CNBC's Seema Mody; and stocks hold steady ahead of the Fed's conclusion to its 2-day meeting, with Danielle Hughes, Divine Capital Markets, and Mike Ozanian, Forbes.

  • Spain train crash driver was on phone

    The driver of the train that crashed in Spain was talking on the phone, reports CNBC's Seema Mody; and Mary Thompson reports on the SEC's closing arguments in the Fabrice Tourre trial.

  • Parents pay less of college costs

    A new study by Sallie Mae digs into just where the funding for college is coming from. CNBC's Hampton Pearson offers insight.

  • Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano

    Janet Napolitano, the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, will step down to lead the University of California system, NBC News confirms.

  • An effort to restore lower interest rates on student loans has failed in the Senate.

  • Lawmakers returned to fights over presidential nominations, student loans and the farm bill, and to the question of whether they can pass immigration reform.

  • Meeting the Student Housing Demand

    What impact might rising student loan debt have on the demand for student housing? Ted Rollins, Campus Crest Communities CEO, offers insight.

  • How Can College Grads Stand Out?

    The unemployment rate for those with a bachelor's degree or higher is just under 4 percent. New college graduates Ryan Boepple of Syracruse University and Brooke Flanagan of Colgate University talk about their time and money invested in college as they face the job market.

  • Student Loan Rates Double

    CNBC's Hampton Pearson reports that interest rates on new subsidized Stafford loans are doubling to 6.8 percent after a bipartisan Senate group failed to agree on a plan.

  • Rising student loan debt and high unemployment may prevent college graduates from achieving financial goals and spill over into the U.S. economy, according to a recent report.

  • Student Loan Rates Double Today

    Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-VT) discusses a bill he co-sponsored that would restore the student loan rate to 3.4% and explains why it should be the first order of business after the Senate's recess.