College Colleges & Universities

  • War on Winners?

    The principal at Ipswitch Middle School cancelled honors night. Is America breeding a nation of underachievers? Dan Greenhaus, BTIG and Gary Shapiro, Consumer Electronics Association CEO, share their opinions. "Someone should be on a pedestal somewhere," says Greenhaus.

  • Pacers' GM Shares His March Madness Pick

    The "Fast Money" traders discuss where they think Qualcomm and Microsoft's stocks are headed; and Kevin Pritchard of the Indiana Pacers shares his March Madness pick.

  • Dr. Martha Perez examines a patient at Community Health of South Florida.

    Obamacare and the aging of doctors and patients are exacerbating the shortage of primary care physicians.

  • Tuition Relief In Sight?

    CNBC's Scott Cohn reports college tuition is still rising about twice the rate of inflation according to the latest Consumer Price Index. Financial economist Lindsay Piegza, explains her plans for financial reform in regards to education.

  • Yahoo's Mayer Raising the Bar

    Yahoo's CEO Marissa Mayer ended telecommuting, and now she is reportedly tightening up hiring standards, reports CNBC's Jane Wells; and Fred Hassan of Warburg Pincus, weighs in.

  • Power Rundown: Highly Educated Hiring Practices

    The Secret Service is investigating a possible breach of Michelle Obama's credit report, and Yahoo's Michelle Mayer is changing the hiring practices at the company. CNBC's John Carney and Jane Wells, discuss.

  • No Room For Republicans At Harvard?

    "The Harvard Crimson" is warning conservatives not only to not enroll, but to not apply to the school. Larry Kudlow questions the editor.

  • Robbing Retirement to Save For College

    More families are currently saving for their retirement than for their children's education, according to a new study by Sallie Mae. CNBC's Sharon Epperson reports on what happens when money is taken out of a 401(k) or an IRA to pay for college.

  • College Cheerleader's Half Court Stunt

    A William Carey University cheerleader nails a half-court basketball shot … while doing a back flip. (0:14)

  • Paid to Party?

    The Wall Street Journal dug through government data to find there are many schools where the student loan default rate is higher than the student graduation rate. Mark Kantrowitz, president, offers insight.

  • These days, Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh, a law firm in Atlanta, hires only people with a bachelor’s degree — no exceptions. And it is far from alone. The NYT reports.

  • Is Money 'Poison' For Kids?

    Billionaire Graham Tuckwell has announced he's giving $50 million for college scholarships. CNBC's Robert Frank reports Tuckwell thinks the money would ruin his own kids.

  • Santelli: Time to Reform College Tuition Costs

    CNBC's Rick Santelli talks with Richard Vedder, Center for College Affordability & Productivity, about where the money is coming from to pay huge salaries to some academics to run universities.

  • EPA's Lisa Jackson Quit Over Pipeline?

    Is the Keystone Pipeline going to be improved? CNBC's Larry Kudlow speaks to Josh Margolin of the New York Post, who reported the EPA's Lisa Jackson quit because she was convinced President Obama was ready to give the Keystone Pipeline the green light, for more insight.

  • Pay College Athletes?

    Tonight's national championship between Notre Dame and Alabama will bring millions of dollars to both schools, reports CNBC's Brian Shactman.

  • Gun Sales Rising In Last Few Years

    Shares of gun makers Smith and Wesson and rival Sturm Ruger are under pressure on talks of stricter gun laws, reports CNBC's Mary Thompson.

  • Firearms In America

    "We can't expect events like this as routine," said President Obama at the vigil Sunday night in Newtown, CT. Marc Morial, National Urban League and Ron Christie, Christie Strategies, discuss how to get the country to find middle ground on gun control laws.

  • Johnny Manziel of the Texas A&M University Aggies after being named the 78th winner of the Heisman Memorial Trophy Award

    Johnny Manziel, the freshman sensation who won college football's Heisman Trophy over the weekend, told CNBC Monday that he's in no rush to turn pro but is interested in trademarking his nickname "Johnny Football."

  • College Football: Why Pressure to Win Is Even Bigger Now

    As the regular college football season wraps up, the biggest buzz in recent weeks has been the dizzying number of teams switching conferences.

  • Firing a Coach, at a Price, With Little Evidence the Move Pays Off

    The latest symbol of the college football arms race is not the coaches’ salaries themselves but rather the money that university officials are spending to buy out those huge contracts when a coach falters.