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  • Cloud storage providers often engage in digital dragnets in the hunt for illicit data. But what falls under that category isn't as simple as it seems.

  • Celebrity Hack Victims

    Hackers claim to have what seems to be the First Lady's credit report. CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on what some are calling the "no-hack celebrity attack."

  • top-apple-related-stocks-apple.jpg

    Apple stock jumped Monday amid speculation of a share buyback and dividend. The stock was also getting a bounce from key technical levels.

  • Algorithms are growing ever more powerful but they are not always up to deciphering the ambiguity of human language and the mystery of reasoning. They are being asked to be more humanlike in what they figure out.

  • Nicolas Sarkozy is being wooed by sovereign wealth funds including Qatar's who are ready to back him to start a private equity fund. The Financial Times reports.

  • Sizing Up the PC Landscape

    Dell's core PC business is declining, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt. To make the company private under Michael Dell's plan would mean the company would take on about $15 billion in debt. Gerry Smith, Lenovo President of the Americas, weighs in.

  • The buzz at the South by Southwest festival is all about the gadgets: computers controlled by the wave of a hand, cool new cameras and more.

  • A report that will be voted on in the EU parliament March 12 could lay the groundwork for laws banning pornography across all media — including the Internet — and could potentially restrict free speech advocates claim.

  • There has been the distinction between physical and electronic works--books, songs, movies--since digital goods became widely available a decade ago, but it is now under attack, both in the courts and the marketplace, reports The New York Times.

  • Texas Instruments raised its targets for first-quarter earnings and revenue to the upper end of its previous forecast ranges, due to improving demand for its chips in an industry that has been hit for several quarters by a weak global economy.

  • Carl Icahn

    Carl Icahn demanded Dell pay out $15.7 billion in special dividends, joining a growing chorus of opposition to founder Michael Dell's plan to take the world's No. 3 personal computer maker private.

  • Technological advance in the mobile space have produced a paradigm shift in business practices and etiquette. The skyrocketing use of mobile devices is upending much of what we know and experience in our work lives. Gone is the eight-hour workday, reports USA Today.

  • For all but one of the tech stocks in the Dow Jones, it's been tough sledding since October 2007, when the index last hit 14,198.

  • A large Dell shareholder is demanding the PC maker open its books, signaling that it could become more active in opposing its founder's proposal to take the company private.

  • Chinese hackers are one problem. But so are employees who put company information online with their smartphones and tablets.

  • US intelligence officials are trying to figure out the motive behind recent corporate hack attacks -- and where the biggest threats lie.

  • Yahoo has changed its description in its 10-K, and its is an interesting twist on the "What is Yahoo?" question that has tripped up many recent CEOs. Its also further evidence that current CEO Marissa Mayer is intent on remaking the company.

  • Workers at Groupon

    With a severance of $378.36, Andrew Mason could probably score several vouchers for half-priced Thai dinners or Swedish massages, but the ex-CEO of Groupon might be soured on daily deals for a while.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook.

    The last six times that Cook has put himself out there, Apple's stock declined afterwards. It's a streak that dates back to October 2012.