Economic Reports Consumer Confidence

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  • Stocks Trim Early Losses

    Mark Luschini, Janney Montgomery Scott, weighs in on the markets.

  • Pinnacle Prices IPO

    Pinnacle Foods is expected to price tonight. CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis reports the name behind Duncan Hines, Birdseye and other brand name foods is one of the most highly-anticipated IPOs this year.

  • Mercedes Battles for Younger Buyers

    Sales of Mercedes across America have been accelerating at twice the industry average so far this year, with Steve Cannon, CEO of Mercedes Benz U.S.A. The company is fighting BMW for younger buyers.

  • Euro Banks Too Big to Save: 'Turnaround Chief'

    James Millstein, Chairman & CEO of Millstein & Co., says the problem in Europe is that the banks are too big to save. "These banks are four times the size of Cyprus' GDP," he says.

  • US Airways' Doug Parker on Future of Fares

    US Airways and American announced a merger last month to create the world's largest airline. Doug Parker, chairman & CEO of US Airways, offers insight.

  • Hiring Our Heroes: An Uphill Jobs Battle

    The Chamber of Commerce announces the 100,000th hire in the veteran jobs initiative, with CNBC's Brian Shactman.

  • 'Continual Fiscal Traps' Hurt US Confidence: Economist

    Jared Bernstein, former chief economist & economic policy adviser to U.S. Vice-President Biden, says the U.S. government should focus on bipartisan cooperation to build on the nascent recovery instead of setting continual fiscal traps that slow down confidence growth.

  • Germany's Problem: It Exports to Europe

    Paul Donovan, global economist at UBS, tells CNBC that two years of negative growth in a row in the euro zone takes 'monumental policy incompetence to achieve'.

  • RBC: Why Gold Can't Rally

    George Gero, precious metals strategist at RBC Capital Markets, discusses headwinds facing the yellow metal, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • Shiller: This Housing Recovery Gets a 'B'

    Robert Shiller, professor of economics at Yale University, explains why the housing recovery gets an OK grade, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • Shiller: Housing Looks Like a Mini Bubble

    Economist Robert Shiller tells "Futures Now" why it won't necessarily be clear sailing for the housing recovery. (3:10)

  • Digesting the Economic Numbers: Experts

    Michelle Meyer, BofA Merrill Lynch Global Research; and Jim Dunigan, PNC Wealth Management, discuss how the morning's economic data will impact the markets.

  • Consumer Confidence Drops to 59.7 in March

    CNBC's Rick Santelli reports the latest numbers on consumer sentiment and housing.

  • Top Chartist: S&P Could Soon Fall 5%

    BTIG technician Josh Dollinger explains why he thinks the S&P 500 index could soon feel some downside pressure, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • A "strong holiday lineup" of new products propelled Williams-Sonoma to better-than-expected quarterly earnings, company CEO Laura Alber told CNBC.

  • Here's When the S&P Could Hit an All-Time High: Pro

    Mary Ann Bartels, head of technical and market analysis at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, comments on momentum for a stock market rally, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • Pro: Rally Intact If S&P Holds This Level

    Mary Ann Bartels, head of technical and market analysis at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, looks at important technical indicators with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • Is the Risk-On, Risk-Off Trade Over?

    Professional traders debate attitudes on the trading floor, as well as how retail investors feel about the market, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.

  • Doug Kass: 4 Reasons Apple Is Turning Around

    Widely followed investor Douglas Kass of Seabreeze Partners comments on tailwinds for Apple shares, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the "Futures Now" Traders. (1:27)

  • How Much Long Will the Rally Last? Traders Debate

    From the trading floors in Chicago and New York, the "Futures Now" traders look at what could help or hurt the stock market going forward, with CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis and the Futures Now Traders.