Consumer Discretionary US: Consumer Services

  • A sign advertising $10 dollar toys is seen in the toy department of a Walmart store.

    Wal-Mart Stores said it is finally poised to end its nine straight quarters of declining sales at stores open at least a year in its core U.S. business, SW Retail Advisors analyst Stacey Widlitz told CNBC.

  • Crest

    Procter & Gamble's CEO assured shareholders Tuesday that the company is aiming higher than its latest results.

  • Master Card

    In September 2011, Bank of America announced that it would charge customers a monthly fee of $5 for debit card use.  Consumers may be unhappy with the decision, but they’re already paying fees on their credit and debit cards all the time. Here are some things to watch out for to avoid paying extra fees on credit and debit cards.

  • A man shops at the Abercrombie & Fitch store in the San Francisco Shopping Center in San Francisco, California.

    Amid slumping consumer confidence, shoppers remained resilient, but retailers were reporting mixed results for September.

  • retired couple paperwork

    The Federal Reserve's latest attempt to boost the economy may have a mixed impact on consumers. Some will be helped by lower rates on mortgages and other fixed-rate loans, but savers may see their interest income fall.

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    Americans often check their receipts to make sure they've bought everything they need, and probably to see if what they paid this time is any different from the last trip. The government does the same with the Consumer Price Index. Here are the details. 

  • Fork and knife, place setting on money, cutlery on napkin with plate, expensive food

    Restaurant groupies have always been around, but they're more valuable at a time when the economy is forcing consumers to choose carefully when they eat out, and a few online posts can inform the opinions of thousands.

  • cemetary_stone.jpg

    Taiwan's columbaria products and funeral services provider Lung Yen Life Service, which recently invested $40 million to set up a subsidiary in China, has an analyst bullish on its future earning prospects.

  • Credit Card Statement

    Americans borrowed more in May for the eighth straight month and used their credit cards more for only the second time in nearly three years.

  • Woman selecting clothes from rail in shop

    Many retailers outpaced Wall Street estimates for monthly sales in June, according to early reports out Thursday.

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  • AsSamsung releases its latest Galaxy 10.1 tablet in New York, the key challenge may not be how it does compared to rivals such as the ipad, but how the device is sold.

  • cut_creditcards_200.jpg

    The Federal Reserve says consumer borrowing rose by nearly $7.2 billion, fueled by greater demand for school and auto loans. A category that measures credit card use fell for the second time in three months.

  • Foreclosure

    Sales of distressed U.S. homes fell in the first quarter as demand remained weak, but they still made up about 28 percent of total sales, the highest amount in a year, a RealtyTrac report said Thursday.

  • Shoppers look at handbags at a Coach store in Pasadena, California.

    Coach, the U.S. accessories brand, is planning to shift up to half of its manufacturing out of China to escape rising labour costs at the same time as it moves aggressively to expand its sales in the country.  The FT reports.

  • Last week's attack on Warren Buffett by Wisdom Tree Investments Chairman Michael Steinhardt was "inappropriate and misses the point," Omega Chairman Leon Cooperman told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Car Keys and Money

    With the price of gas above $3.50 a gallon in nearly the entire country, there are signs that Americans are cutting back on driving.

  • As the Federal Aviation Administration starts checking Boeing 737s for cracks after Friday's near disaster with a Southwest Airlines jet, there are looming questions about the age of US airplanes.

  • couple_atm_200.jpg

    J.P. Morgan Chase and other banks are trying to recoup approximately $30 billion a year in lost overdraft fee income by testing $5 ATM fees

  • retired couple paperwork

    A 65-year-old couple retiring this year will need $230,000 to pay for medical expenses throughout retirement, not including nursing-home care. That's 8% lower, but a Fidelity executive says that decrease is temporary.