Intellectual Property Copyrights

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  • The newest version of the Batmobile from “Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice.”

    Batman won't have to worry about Batmobile knockoffs after a court ruled Wednesday the caped crusader's vehicle is entitled to copyright protection.

  • Artists band together for streaming rights

    Al Di Meola, Di Meola Records explains why he thinks streaming is criminal activity and shares his thoughts on the future of the music industry.

  • Pandora vows to appeal BMI court ruling

    Pandora said it would appeal a court ruling that could force it to pay more in royalties.

  • Katy Perry performs during the Super Bowl XLIX halftime show in Glendale, Ariz., Feb. 1, 2015.

    Attempts to register a design for the "Left Shark" Internet sensation were quashed by a trademark examiner.

  • Recording artist Katy Perry performs during the Pepsi Super Bowl XLIX Halftime Show on February 1, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.

    For under $130, you, too, can be the #LeftShark, Katy Perry says.

  • Recording artist Katy Perry performs during the Pepsi Super Bowl XLIX Halftime Show on February 1, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.

    Online shop served a cease-and-desist order from Katy Perry's lawyers for printing Left Shark figurines.

  • Taylor Swift's Spotify pull 'bad decision': Analyst

    Taylor Swift has refused to put her new album on Spotify, and pulled her old albums from the music streaming service. Rich Greenfield, BTIG analyst, shares his opinions.

  • Another setback for Aereo

    The U.S. Copyright Office has told Aereo it does not qualify as a cable company, reports CNBC's Sara Eisen.

  • McNamee: Supreme Court quashed innovation

    Roger McNamee, Elevation Partners co-founder, weighs in on the Supreme Court's decision to deem Aereo illegal. McNamee says copyright law has been abused to protect old franchises. CNBC's Jon Fortt provides insight.

  • A statue of Sherlock Holmes near the site of the fictional detective's home at 221B Baker Street.

    Fifty Sherlock Holmes works published before 1923 by Arthur Conan Doyle are in the public domain, a U.S. appeals court said.

  • Adam Yauch, Mike Diamond and Adam Horovitz of Beastie Boys

    A New York City jury has awarded the Beastie Boys $1.7 million in a copyright violation case against drink company Monster Beverage.

  • Robert De Niro in "Raging Bull"

    The Supreme Court said Paula Petrella did not wait too long to file her lawsuit against Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer claiming an interest in the film.

  • Oracle

    A U.S. appeals court on Friday ruled that Oracle is entitled to copyright protection over certain parts of the Java programming language in a high profile lawsuit against Google.

  • US Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Tuesday whether to rule against online TV startup Aereo in a major copyright case.

  • Aereo's landmark court case

    The Supreme Court is hearing arguments today about the legality of Internet television service Aereo, reports NBC's Pete Williams.

  • It's fun to own the 'YMCA'

    The Village People's original singer has regained control over songs written for the group 35 years later. CNBC's Jane Wells has the details and Victor Willis, original singer for the Village People, explains his battle for the copyrights.

  • US-patent-application-200.jpg

    China has overtaken the United States to become the world's biggest processor of patent applications, giving an innovative edge to Beijing's economic and industrial clout.

  • Ericsson Sues Samsung for Patent Infringement

    Ericsson, the world's biggest telecom network equipment maker, said on Tuesday it had filed a suit in the United States against Samsung Electronics for patent infringement.

  • New Revolution: Great Ideas Needed

    Chris Anderson, Wired Magazine, discusses how anyone with a great idea could spark the nation's next industrial revolution through the latest innovations in technology.

  • The Village People, circe 1981

    In a court ruling with significant implications for the music industry, a California judge has dismissed a suit by two song publishing companies aimed at preventing Victor Willis, former lead singer of the 1970s disco group the Village People, from exercising his right to reclaim ownership of “YMCA” and other hit songs he wrote, the New York Times reports.