Crime Corporate Fraud

  • The U.S. Justice Department is expected to seek indictments of up to four former BP traders as early as Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported in its online edition.

  • Oil major BP faces fines in excess of $300 million to settle civil and criminal probes related to market manipulation charges and a Texas refinery explosion that killed 15 workers in 2005.

  • A U.S. securities regulator Tuesday warned investors to be wary of scams touting huge potential profits from energy-related stocks, when the onlypeople likely to make money are those running the schemes.

  • The chief executive of online gaming company Unibet Group has been arrested in the Netherlands on a French warrant, the company said Tuesday.

  • Singapore's SembCorp Marine removed its finance director, alleging he entered into unauthorized foreign-exchange transactions that could lead to an estimated US$248 million in losses. 

  • The head of French media group Lagardere survived a challenge to his seat on a new board at Airbus parent EADS on Monday despite calls from minority shareholders that he should step down.

  • Conagra Foods on Wednesday said it is not the target of a federal investigation into possible fraud and corruption in supplying the U.S. military in Iraq, denying information in a newspaper report.

  • Bank of Cyprus denied on Tuesday civil money laundering charges filed against it by US prosecutors, saying the case was legally and factually without merit.

  • Citigroup CEO Charles Prince will get more time to help turn around the company's fortunes, according to CNBC On Air Editor Charles Gasparino.

  • Orthopedic device makers Zimmer Holdings, Stryker, Medtronic and Biomet have been notified that U.S. securities regulators intend to investigate possible violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing an case that some say may alter the landscape of investing. The outcome potentially could strengthen shareholder confidence -- or stifle investment markets.

  • Steven G. Schulman was charged in Los Angeles as part of a seven-year investigation into allegations that kickbacks were paid to people who agreed to be plaintiffs in class-action suits.

  • On Oct. 9, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that some say may open the flood gates to a tidal wave of investor lawsuits. Legal experts joined CNBC to debate both sides of the issue.

  • US Treasury debt prices were steady early Tuesday as investors looked ahead to the release of minutes from the Federal Reserve's policy meeting last month when the central bank cut benchmark interest rates.

  • The head of European aerospace group EADS said in remarks published on Tuesday he would propose scrapping the company's management stock option system amid an ongoing insider trading investigation.

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is preparing to warn physicians about hazards with drugs that use ultrasound imaging machines to enhance the diagnosis of heart problems, the Wall Street Journal reported on its Web site on Sunday.

  • Yahoo

    Yahoo, is working with auction leader eBay and its PayPal payments unit to block fake e-mails to users purporting to be from eBay and PayPal, hoping to spur on an industry that has been slow to fight the scourge of so-called phishing attacks.

  • 3COM.jpg

    Bain Capital Partners said it will submit for a national security review its proposed $2.2 billion buyout of networking equipment maker 3Com Corp.

  • Old and new bottles of Tylenol products.

    This week it's 25 years since the first of seven people in Chicagoland died after taking Tylenol laced with cyanide. The scare led to new industry-standard, tamper-resistant over-the-counter drug packaging and became an enduring textbook case for corporate crisis management.

  • Oscar Wyatt

    Texas oilman Oscar Wyatt pleaded guilty Monday to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, one of five counts against him for his role in the U.N. oil-for-food scandal.