Leadership Corporate Leaders

  • Wal-Mart Stores topped Wall Street expectations with its 9.8% jump in fourth-quarter profit. So why would anyone want CEO H. Lee Scott to quit? Consultants William Marquard and Michael Bergdahl joined "Power Lunch" to explain -- and perhaps refute -- that thinking.

  • Will Sirius' Howard Stern find true love with XM's Opie & Anthony? Blair Levin, managing director at Stifel Nicolaus (and former chief of staff at the FCC) told CNBC's Liz Claman he is "cautiously optimistic" that the satellite radio merger will be approved -- thanks to new technology.

  • Top U.S. chief executives are right in worrying about healthcare costs -- after all, they'll exceed profits next year.

  • Nearly half of CEOs polled by the Business Council say it’s gotten tougher to find qualified workers in the U.S.

  • Douglas Parker, US Airways CEO

    There’s no question that the DUI arrest of US Airways Chief Executive Douglas Parker last month is making headlines in a way that probably wouldn’t have happened in decades past. CEO’s are no longer private citizens, and media scrutiny of corporate America has turned some of them into celebrities. Although the buck stops at the corner office, where....

  • SS_Rare_Earth_Elements_Lutetium.jpg

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The WEF meeting is tackling the issue by asking basic questions: What’s an appropriate level for top managers? Who defines “appropriate” and how?  Should a CEO’s pay be linked to the company’s performance? The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects. (More)

  • Most people have encountered professional challenges of one kind or another. But as any successful entrepreneur will tell you, success comes after you master the art of making lemonade, so to speak. On today’s “Squawk Box," CNBC spoke with three high-profile business leaders who prevailed after suffering a serious setback.

  • Michael Dell, Chairman & CEO, Dell

    In a memo to Dell employees days after returning as chief executive officer, Michael Dell said the beleaguered computer maker is quashing bonuses for 2006 and reducing managers to help cut costs and steer the company back toward dominance.

  • On Wall Street, there’s a guilty pleasure in watching the rich and powerful stumble.  After the resignation Dell Chief Executive Kevin Rollins, many investors began quietly asking where the axe might fall next. Jon Ogg, the editor of 24/7 Wall Street.com, has accurately predicted changes at the helm of Home Depot, Gap and, as we mentioned, Dell. Today on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” we asked the question that everyone is wondering.

  • We've mentioned today's report on global warming in an earlier post--so let's get right to one of the major questions: is corporate America taking global warming as a serious issue or not? Some are it seems as reported earlier this month when 10 companies and their CEOs joined activist groups in calling for caps on carbon emissions.

  • Robert Nardelli

    Former Home Depot CEO Robert Nardelli could have stayed as chief executive of the home-products giant if he had agreed to take a $20 million cut in his contract that entitled him to around $200 million, CNBC'S Charlie Gasparino has learned.

  • Michael Dell, Chairman & CEO, Dell

    Dell, who takes over as CEO for ousted Kevin Rollins, ends a four-year hiatus during which the company issued the largest consumer electronics recall ever, found itself the subject of a formal investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and lost its position as the world's largest PC maker to a rejuvenated Hewlett-Packard

  • A controversial U.S. Senate bill on minimum wage is set to be voted on later today – it includes a provision that is designed to reign in executive pay by capping tax-deferred compensation at $1 million or a 5 year average of taxable salary, whichever is less.

  • Michael Dell, Chairman & CEO, Dell

    Dell  announced that Michael Dell will assume the duties of chief executive officer, replacing Kevin Rollins, who resigned.  Dell will remain chairman of the troubled computer maker.

  • Sanofi Aventis

    Rumors about merger talks between pharmaceutical giants Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers have picked up speed after French financial newsletter La Lettre de I Expansion reported a deal was in the works. Thomas Burnett, director of research at Wall Street Access, was on “Morning Call” to give his take on the possible friendly takeover.

  • The days of Enron and WorldCom-sized corporate malfeasance scandals may seem like they just ended, but another debate regarding corporate ethics is reaching critical mass in boardrooms across the country – the issue of executive compensation. Adding fuel to the fire were the recent lucrative severance packages for Home Depot CEO Bob Nardelli ($210 million) and Pfizer  CEO Hank McKinnell...

  • SS_Rare_Earth_Elements_Lutetium.jpg

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The WEF meeting is tackling the issue by asking basic questions: What’s an appropriate level for top managers? Who defines “appropriate” and how?  Should a CEO’s pay be linked to the company’s performance? The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects. (More)

  • Generics hurt sales of Bristol-Myers Squibb's top-selling and most profitable drug Plavix, and Bristol-ImClone cancer drug Erbitux. Also: This afternoon, ICOS shareholders vote on the Eli Lilly buyout offer -- see the results ASAP on CNBC.com.

  • Dow Chemical  is looking to make acquisitions, but the amount of private-equity money floating around has made lots of businesses in chemical sector expensive, the company's chief executive told CNBC.

  • Chief executives worldwide expect growth in markets such as Brazil, China, India and Russia to keep increasing and are optimistic about higher revenues at their companies, but they are concerned about over-regulation and finding enough skilled workers.