Business Events Corporate Restructuring

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  • An investment firm seeking board seats at New York Times disclosed Thursday that it has increased its stake in the company again, to 15.6%. 

  • Investors in subprime-stricken lender IKB took a further blow on Monday as details of government plans to rescue and sell the bank stoked uncertainty and wiped a further quarter off the shares.

  • WestLB's owners stumped up a further 3 billion euros ($4.4 billion) to rescue the state-sector lender which said it would slash up to 1,500 jobs in the next two years as it prepares to be sold.

  • Shares in Alcatel-Lucent dropped in U.S. trading, after the company scrapped its 2007 dividend and predicted a loss for the current quarter.

  • Australian financial services firm MFS said on Monday it will sell a 65 percent stake in its Stella tourism business to private equity firm CVC Asia Pacific, raising enough cash to meet its short-term debt obligations.

  • Motorola's Razr V3 cell phone.

    Shares of Motorola rose 10 percent Friday after the company said it was considering splitting off its mobile phone division, the company's biggest unit.

  • Yahoo!'s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Terry Semel.

    Yahoo nonexecutive Chairman Terry Semel is leaving the board, the Internet company said Thursday, announcing the end of its formal ties with the ex-CEO credited with reviving the company and then losing touch.

  • Motorola's Razr V3 cell phone.

    Motorola said on Thursday it is considering separating its loss-making mobile phone unit, in an apparent concession to demands from activist investor Carl Icahn, sending its shares up 12.7 percent.

  • IAC

    Liberty Media's John Malone, a longtime business partner of Barry Diller, took action Monday to oust Diller from the board of the IAC/InterActiveCorp Internet conglomerate.

  • Sprint Nextel said Thursday Chief Financial Officer Paul Saleh and two other top executives would leave the company in a new management shake-up as the No. 3 U.S. mobile service grapples with subscriber declines.

  • Retailer Sears Holdings, looking to turn around its business after recent profit declines, detailed a new structure that separates its business units and simplifies the way they are managed, and its shares shot up as much as 19 percent.

  • Japanese electronics firm Fujitsu said on Monday it would put its struggling semiconductor operations into a new unit, in a move that could smooth the way for partnerships with other chipmakers.

  • UBS, the biggest European casualty of the U.S. subprime crisis, said it was shrinking its investment banking business, cutting staff and drastically downscaling its exposure to risky investments.

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    The Austrian capital is the city where the old EU meets the new EU. Teeming with international organizations, it's also the city that was the first to foray into Eastern European banking and the destination for tasty pastry.

  • EMI

    British music company EMI is to axe up to 2,000 jobs in a restructuring plan by its new private-equity owners to save up to 200 million pounds ($392 million) a year and recast itself for the digital age.

  • Merrill Lynch

    Merrill Lynch is expected to suffer $15 billion in losses stemming from soured mortgage investments, almost double its original estimate, prompting the firm to raise additional capital from an outside investor.

  • It's that time of the year again, when Germany's trade unions traditionally put their wage demands on the table for the opening rounds of the annual ritual that is called "collective wage bargaining". And, with the economy growing at a robust pace still and with corporate profits on the rise, the voice of the unions is getting louder again. We've already had some taste of strike this season. Is there more to come?

  • British aero-engine maker Rolls-Royce Group plans to cut 2,300 jobs from among its managerial, professional and clerical staff to help offset rising costs and the effect of the weak dollar.

  • thyssenkrupp.jpg

    An evocative smell from childhood can quickly trigger the realization that cost cutting is not a strategy, but a reaction that, without corresponding investment, will doom industries.

  • James Cayne has resigned as chief executive officer of Bear Stearns, amid widespread concern over his management of the Wall Street firm, CNBC has learned.