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Credit Credit Ratings

  • Frederic Oudea

    Societe Generale's CEO dismissed rumors that France's second-largest bank was in trouble and blamed the recent downgrade of the US credit rating for fueling speculation that France might lose its Triple-A status as well.

  • Brad Jones, Asia Investment Strategist at Deutsche Bank, and Richard Jerram, Chief Economist at Bank of Singapore discuss investment opportunities amid the current environment.

  • BofA's Moynihan vs. Berkowitz

    Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan had his big call with investors, including Bruce Berkowitz of Fairholme, with Paul Miller, FBR, and the Fast Money traders.

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    The past week's market drops and swings are dizzying. Everyday people are commenting that it is scarier than 2008. Now, that probably isn't true because no one is anticipating the inability to take money out of ATMs or the commercial paper market shutting down. Yet, there is something unnerving about the market declines, the uncertainty surrounding the economy and the lack of confidence in political leaders.

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    Analysts point out that U.S. banks have become much better capitalized than they were during the financial crisis of 2008. But shares of US major banks continue to move sharply lower.

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    We had a flash crash. Then we had a flash rally. Now we're flashing again to the downside. I think we should all go away for a few days and give it a rest.

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    The dollar has held up nicely post-downgrade, and this strategist says the strength could continue.

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    With long-term U.S. debt being knocked out of the elite triple-A credit club, investors’ top-tier fixed income choices have dwindled yet again.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Goldman Sachs on Wednesday reviewed its position on further monetary stimulus, saying that further quantitative easing had a greater than ever chance of being implemented in the United States.

  • Ben Bernanke Bounce?

    Mad Money host Jim Cramer describes today's roller coaster action, as the Dow rose 430 points following the Fed's announcement.

  • Mutiny at the Fed

    Fed leaves rates unchanged, with Dan Greenhaus, BTIG.

  • Ben Bernanke press conference following rate decision.

    Big moves are not being anticipated today and, truth is, the Fed has no big moves left in its deck of cards. The Benjamin might not say anything. But there are some policy steps that could be taken, even though the benefits are modest.

  • Market expectations for future growth shifting rapidly towards uncertainty over global debt servicing.

  • John Wayne

    Investors woke up Monday to a world in which America is seen as a greater credit risk than anytime in recent history, and they didn't like what they saw. The conversation around why we were downgraded can get as wonky as we want, but let’s not get caught up in the weeds. We are where we are because the problem is simple: Our country spends far more than it takes in—trillions more.

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    The Swiss franc and yen are flying high as investors bail out of riskier currencies — it's time for your Tuesday FX Fix.

  • U.S. Treasurys: A Bond By Any Other Name

    An in-depth look at U.S. debt and the likelihood the country will be able to pay it back using its own resources, with Richard Bove, Rochdale Securities vice president of equity research.

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    Despite the mass sell-off in the markets, investors shouldn't panic yet, according to Mark Tinker, Global Portfolio Manager, AXA Framlington.

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    Following huge losses for the Dow on Monday and further selling in Asia overnight, the markets are watching what the Fed and Ben Bernanke will do at their July Meeting today. Speculation is mounting that the Fed will attempt to restore calm but one fund manager thinks that policy action is unnecessary.

  • Oil traders on the floor of the New York Mercantile Exchange, New York.

    As markets braced themselves for another turbulent day Tuesday, one economist warned that the real danger of a double-dip recession is protectionism.

  • Dr. Marc Faber

    Marc Faber, who predicted just last week that a bear market was on its way back, says the current selloff in equities is overdone and he expects a short-term rebound.