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  • Customers line up to enter a Northern Rock branch in Bromley, in south-east London, 14 September 2007.

    JC Flowers, the private equity group that has expressed interest in troubled U.K. mortgage bank Northern Rock, has secured about £15 billion of funding which could be used for a takeover, the Financial Times reported on Wednesday.

  • Shares in Australian mortgage lender RAMS Home Loans Group tumbled as much as 27% on Wednesday, compounding the previous day's blood-letting as doubts crept in over its deal with Westpac Banking.

  • Manhattan skyline

    Manhattan apartment prices climbed to a record level in the third quarter, defying the trend of the overall U.S. housing market, according to reports released Tuesday.

  • Pressure is mounting on Deutsche Bank to reveal the full impact of a global credit crisis on its results after UBS announced a shock third-quarter loss and Citibank said profits were badly hit.

  • Westpac Banking will buy the distribution arm of mortgage lender RAMS Home Loans Group, a high-profile Australian victim of the fallout from the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis, for $125 million.

  • Bill Gross

    Bill Gross said that the subprime mortgage crisis will dominate Federal Reserve policy "over the next several years" and believes short-term U.S. interest rates could fall to 3-3/4 percent over the next six to 12 months.

  • Smaller hedge fund firms hard hit by the current tighter credit conditions may be bought by larger, more traditional fund houses or may simply fold, law firm Eversheds told Reuters.

  • UBS headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland.

    UBS, the world's largest wealth manager, unveiled $3.4 billion in losses, swept out senior managers and slashed jobs in one of the biggest casualties yet from the worldwide credit crunch.

  • Credit Suisse  said on Monday its results would be "adversely impacted" by the market turmoil but it would remain profitable in the third quarter of 2007.

  • Australian hedge fund Basis Capital has proposed splitting its surviving fund in two to save the business, which has been hit by its exposure to risky credit derivatives, the Financial Times newspaper reported.

  • Britain will raise depositors' protection on their savings to 35,000 pounds, finance minister Alistair Darling will say on Monday after the country suffered its first bank run in more than a century last month.

  • Customers line up to enter a Northern Rock branch in Bromley, in south-east London, 14 September 2007.

    Stricken British mortgage lender Northern Rock has borrowed a further 5 billion pounds ($10 billion) from the Bank of England, the Financial Times reports.  

  • KB Homes

    Recent comments by CNBC’s Jim Cramer have revived a debate over whether home prices have hit bottom or will continue falling.

  • Sallie Mae

    Shares of Sallie Mae recovered some ground on Thursday, as traders bet that the endangered $25 billion deal to take over the student lender could be renegotiated at a lower price.

  • Standard & Poor's, under fire for its role in the U.S. housing market meltdown, is taking steps to ensure its ratings are sound and is reviewing its rated transactions more frequently, the credit rating agency told a Senate panel Wednesday.

  • Late payments on U.S. home equity lines of credit rose to a 5-1/2 year high in the second quarter of 2007 but delinquencies on many other types of consumer loans fell, the American Bankers Association said Wednesday.

  • Not one institution took up the Bank of England's offer of a 3-month loan on Wednesday in a sign credit conditions are easing and because the money only came at a punishing interest rate.

  • Merrill Lynch's subprime mortgage unit, First Franklin Financial, could cut about $100 million from the brokerage's third-quarter profit on an impairment charge, a Wall Street analyst said Tuesday.

  • Angelo Mozilo

    Countrywide Chief Executive Angelo Mozilo said Tuesday the largest U.S. mortgage lender is "out" of the subprime business, apart from offering home loans eligible for purchase by government-sponsored enterprises.

  • Nationstar Mortgage, the subprime unit of Fortress Investment Group, said it is no longer accepting new loan applications from brokers, a signal the lender is winding down operations.