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  • Citigroup's subprime mortgage business is not suffering the way some rivals' businesses have suffered, and "actually looks pretty good," according to Steven Freiberg, chief executive of the largest U.S. bank's North American consumer operations.

  • United States Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said on Wednesday a recovery in the subprime mortgage market will be slowed by a wave of interest rate resets and urged lenders to help troubled borrowers.

  • Abbey, the U.K. arm of Spanish banking giant Banco Santander, is the first high street bank to raise its mortgage rates in the wake of the turmoil in the financial markets.

  • Bank of England Governor Mervyn King stood firm against bailing out struggling banks on Wednesday, but hinted that interest rates had reached their peak as he made his first comments since the credit crisis swept global markets.

  • The U.S. economy will slow next year amid continued trouble in the housing market, likely leading to lower interest rates, a senior International Monetary Fund official said Wednesday.

  • Barclays Capital bailed out a highly-leveraged investment fund, hit by recent tightness in the credit market, with a $1.5-billion (738-million-pound) lifeline,  London newspaper the Times reported Wednesday.

  • An all out battle will soon be joined by Sallie Mae and its bankers on one side and the private equity firm of J.C. Flowers and its banks and co-investors J.P. Morgan and BankAmerica.

  • Some 57 percent of mortgage broker customers were unable to refinance their adjustable-rate loans to avoid higher monthly payments in August, suggesting the U.S. housing slump may worsen, according to a national survey on Tuesday.

  • The U.S. Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday that some advertisements for home mortgages might be deceptive and even violate the law.

  • Luminent Mortgage Capital, which has struggled with liquidity problems because of mortgage investments, Tuesday said it has reduced its debt exposure and cut staff, helping to stabilize its business.

  • If the U.S. economy goes into a recession, investors are going to need some strong defensive stocks.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Forget the nerds at the Fed. Investors are better off banking with these fantasy picks.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Larry White

    The meltdown in the mortgage market and its impact on the credit markets may have some historical precedent; the collapse of the savings and loan industry and its subsequent government bailout in the late 1980s and early 1990s was also a major lending debacle.

  • European corporates' mostly solid balance sheets should help them withstand the credit market turmoil, but "junk" bond defaults are set to rise owing to higher borrowing costs, Moody's Investors Service said.

  • Lewis, who prefers to keep a low profile, wouldn't comment on his stake in Bear Stearns when CNBC spoke to him on Monday. But the move speaks to the kind of investor he is -- often seeing value where others see risk.

  • For Sale Signs

    Could the housing market's woes spread to bonds held in mutual funds by millions of ordinary investors?

  • Washington Mutual's headquarters in Seattle.

    Two of the largest U.S. banking companies said Monday that tough credit market conditions may cause higher losses related to lending.

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    Economists are clearly worried about the U.S. falling into a recession, but they also believe the Federal Reserve can help prevent one by cutting interest rates.

  • Half a dozen states are working together to investigate rating agencies, banks and other players that benefited from the onetime boom in subprime mortgages that has since turned into a meltdown, Ohio Attorney General Marc Dann told Reuters.

  • Stocks ended the holiday-shortened week lower as surprisingly weak monthly employment report sparked worries of a U.S. economic recession. The Dow Jones Industrial Average posted a weekly loss of 1.7%, the S&P 500 fell 1.3% and the Nasdaq Composite declined 1.2%.