CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Daniel Bukszpan

Daniel Bukszpan
Senior Writer and Producer

Daniel Bukszpan is a senior writer and producer for CNBC.com. He has been a freelance writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • There are few things more convenient than living near one’s workplace. The stress of commuting is minimal when the office is ten minutes away by car, and sunny days afford the opportunity for leisurely walks home at sunset while coworkers sit in bumper-to-bumper traffic.Baseball players have to travel the country during the regular season, so this scenario isn’t an option for six months out of the year. The one time when this scenario does, in fact, play out for them is during spring training, w

    There are few things more convenient than living near one’s workplace, but baseball players travel during the season. See where some of Major League Baseball’s stars live during spring training.

  • The Brookings Institution recently issued a report the compared per-capita gross domestic product and changes in employment data from 2010 to 2011 in 200 of the world’s largest metropolitan areas. The report found that these areas produced 48 percent of global output despite accounting for only 14 percent of the world’s population and employment.In other findings: Ninety percent of the fastest-growing economies were outside North America and western Europe; U.S. metropolitan areas outperformed t

    The Brookings Institution analyzed the financial data of the world’s largest metropolitan areas and uncovered some interesting findings. Check out which cities were the most productive.

  • unemployment_line3_2011_200.jpg

    There’s been a steady decline in the unemployment rate, but there’s a catch. The definition of “unemployed” only includes people who sought work in the last four weeks and excludes everyone else, including the underemployed and the long-term unemployed. What have they been doing since they fell off the radar?

  • Most of the time, people with demanding jobs want to leave them behind when quitting time arrives. Law clerks don’t want to file more briefs when they get home, actuaries don’t want to weigh financial risk from their comfy chairs, and accounts receivable clerks don’t want to send past-due invoices over dinner.However, some people have no choice but to bring aspects of the workplace to their day-to-day lives. Take the professional race car driver. Unless he or she lives above a convenience store,

    CNBC.com presents a list of current race car drivers and the cars they drive when they’re off duty and in no hurry to get anywhere at any particular time.

  • Unemployed man searching classifieds

    If you’ve scoured the classified ads, you’ve seen listings offering big money to the self-employed. Be your own boss and earn a fortune while clad in a bathrobe and flip-flops! Unfortunately, these ads often target people without jobs, and if they take the bait, they become trapped in a self-employment scam.

  • Paul-Allen-Billionaire-Sports-Team-Owners-CNBC.jpg

    Check out some of the billionaires from all over the world who have added a major sports team or two to their portfolios.

  • Unfinished mansion nicknamed "Versailles" up for sale "as is" by owner and timeshare tycoon David Siegel in Windermere, Florida.

    If you’re looking for some Orlando real estate, there’s a 90,000-square-foot mansion that might interest you. It’s the largest single-family home in the U.S., and it’s been on the market since 2010. It’s still under construction, and the “as-is” asking price for the unfinished home is $75 million.

  • Just a few years ago, when foreclosures were coming fast and furious, some cities experienced more than their fair share of the pain. It stood to reason that the harder hit a city was, the less likely it was to make a hasty recovery. However, according to  the official site of the National Association of Realtors, some of the cities whose housing markets bore the brunt of the foreclosures are now leading the way toward recovery.Using data from Realtor.com, CNBC.com ranks the cities with the most

    When foreclosures were fast and furious, some cities experienced more than their share of the pain. Check out which American cities made this year’s list of the top 10 turnaround towns.

  • In January, 243,000 new private-sector jobs were created, bringing the unemployment rate to 8.3 percent. While these numbers aren’t exactly cause to pop the champagne corks just yet, they do offer evidence that the worst of the recession may be behind us, and better times may lie ahead.People returning to the workforce are unlikely to see the same job market that they knew before the recession. Some industries were hit harder than others, and while some jobs will make a return engagement in the

    It’s impossible to say what a fully recovered U.S. economy will look like, or how long it will take to get there. However, some sectors have begun to hire again.

  • Paula Deen

    Paula Deen has been teaching comfort food cooks since 2002. On January 17, 2012, she announced her diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. She also announced that she had become the spokesperson for the anti-diabetes drug Victoza. However, she’s hardly the only celebrity chef to make a questionable endorsement deal.