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CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Daniel Bukszpan

Daniel Bukszpan
Special to CNBC.com

Daniel Bukszpan is a freelance contributor for CNBC.com. He has been a writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • Cover-Alice-In-Wonderland-Highest-Grossing-Fantasy-Movies-CNBC.jpg

    Fantasy is a movie genre that requires huge budgets but sometimes it's worth the investment. Which are the highest grossing fantasy movies of all time? Find out!

  • The stereotype about professional athletes’ wives is they’re not much more than gold-digging arm candy, with few accomplishments of their own. The stereotype no longer applies today, thanks to the efforts of some high-profile women who established themselves well before they married their famous husbands.Many of the wives of today’s professional athletes are entrepreneurs and business professionals. Some of them have been so successful in their chosen fields they are as famous as their husbands.

    What follows is a list of the wives of 10 athletes who’ve made names for themselves as columnists, models, designers and more.

  • Technically, the recession is over, and on paper, there has been positive job growth for months. Unfortunately, “technically” and “on paper” don’t cut it for people who have been out of work for a long time. For the long-term unemployed, it’s time to start thinking outside of the box and looking for work that falls outside of the parameters of the everyday.What follows is a list of jobs that are obscure, unheard-of or otherwise out of the ordinary. Some of them pay well, some have salaries that

    For the long-term unemployed, it’s time to start thinking outside of the box and looking for jobs that are obscure, unheard-of or otherwise out of the ordinary.

  • In 1968, pop artist Andy Warhol said: "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes." Unlike most of his art, the saying found a foothold in pop culture, and to this day it’s commonly used to describe the here-today-gone-tomorrow status of many celebrities.Like reality show stars and pop singers, professional athletes are celebrities, too, and for every Michael Jordan who parlays his athletic stardom into successful business ventures, there are dozens of others who burst into the

    For every Michael Jordan, there are dozens who have just a brief moment in the sun. Read ahead to see athletes who faded away after their 15 minutes of fame.

  • Every so often, a movie or television show depicts a character in an outfit that becomes iconic. It probably isn’t the intention of most filmmakers to inspire fashion revolutions with their movies, but the makers of “Flashdance” probably didn’t mind when America’s teenage girls started blowing their entire allowances on legwarmers.Not every movie or television show can achieve such a feat on that kind of scale, but many try, with varying degrees of success. What follows is a list of those that m

    What follows is a list of those that made an article of clothing famous, made characters famous for fashion sense, or managed some combination of the two.

  • The career of a professional athlete on the field doesn’t last forever. The shrewd ones know that, and for those who want their money to work for them beyond age 40, having a solid plan B is of paramount importance. So they start thinking about ways to invest their money wisely to make it last a lifetime.Often, athletes will put their money back into sports. After hanging up his jersey, Michael Jordan invested his money in the Charlotte Bobcats basketball team, and although LeBron James is still

    By now, most people have gotten the memo that there’s money to be made in technology, including professional athletes. Check out the athletes who have chosen the tech sector as their next arena of competition.

  • The mean amount of time spent commuting by U.S. workers is 23.8 minutes, according to a from the Census Bureau. At first glance, that doesn’t seem so bad. It’s enough time to hear the weather report, drink some coffee and listen to “Free Bird” on the radio. But that figure also signifies that the average U.S. worker is in a car for almost four hours a week. That’s 45 minutes longer than it takes to watch “Titanic.”With that kind of time on the road a regular fixture in commuters’ lives, the car

    Kelley Blue Book has provided CNBC.com with its list of 10 cars that are the best for commuting. Check out the list.

  • In the immortal words of Barbra Streisand, people who need people are the luckiest people in the world. But what about the rest of us? We don’t all have what it takes to be gregarious, and outgoing, and one’s ability to be sociable, or lack thereof, can affect the type of employment one ends up taking.The extroverted have a bevy of jobs that let them press the flesh. There are sales, management, life coaching, and any number of other jobs that demand constant interaction with others. On the othe

    Many jobs that let reserved types work in solitude offer poor salaries and unchallenging work. But there are other careers that are stimulating, well-paying and require little human contact.

  • On January 29, 2012, the New York Times ran a  about Greek Olympic athletes. The nation’s debt crisis has forced Greece to implement austerity measures, which affected its ability to fund its athletes’ training.Their stipends are chronically late, their training centers have closed and their coaches aren’t being paid. It’s a surreal situation for the birthplace of the Olympics to find itself in.As in Greece, the governments of many other countries throughout the world have financed the athletic

    Many countries finance their Olympic competitors, but not the United States, where athletes fund their own training.

  • Tax season is safely behind us, so it’s time to breathe a sigh of relief. But if you paid more to the IRS than you feel you should have, maybe it’s also time to start thinking about doing things a little differently. Maybe it’s time to think about living in a state where the tax burden is less than it is where you are now.Some states have low property taxes, low gasoline taxes and low sales taxes. Some have low income tax rates, and some expect not one cent of income tax revenue from its residen

    If you paid more taxes than you feel you should have, maybe you should think about living in a state with a lower tax burden. See which states qualify as American tax havens.