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CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Daniel Bukszpan

Daniel Bukszpan
Special to CNBC.com

Daniel Bukszpan is a freelance contributor for CNBC.com. He has been a writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • It’s not tax time just yet, but it’s looming uncomfortably on the horizon. The conscientious among us have already filed their tax forms or are in the process of doing so. The rest of us hem, haw and put it off until the last minute.Apart from the punctual and the lackadaisical, another category of taxpayer exists: The taxpayer who, for one reason or another, has failed to accurately disclose all of his or her earnings. Sometimes this is a simple mistake. Sometimes it’s the accountant’s fault. S

    Some celebrities, including Lauryn Hill, fell out of good standing with the IRS, and paid dearly for it. Read ahead to see some of the celebrities who just didn’t get that return in on time.

  • What makes a movie a box office  "bomb "?  Just losing money doesn't make it qualify. It's the amount of loss from the production costs to ticket receipts that makes the difference.  For example., 2006’s Zyzzyx Road took in a shocking thirty (30) dollars at the box office, but since it cost only $1 million to make, it d didn't lose enough money to make the list.  And the 2000 John Travolta vehicle Battlefield Earth made back less than half of its $73 million budget ,but losing a mere $43 million

    When adjusted for inflation many of the biggest losses exceed $100 million according to BoxOfficeMojo.com. So click to see which movies, in order, are the biggest box office bombs of all time.

  • The U.S. gross domestic product has been climbing, according to the  While this is good news for the overall economy, it represents a problem for the trucking industry, which  to haul the nation’s goods.Transport Capital Partners’ fourth quarter Business Expectations Survey indicated that the driver shortage had improved ever so slightly since August, which TCP’s Richard Mikes attributed to aggressive recruiting on the part of carriers. However, 70 percent of carriers still reported persistently

    Despite the perception about a lack of work, there are jobs that employers can’t fill. Applicants may lack training, or the jobs may not pay enough. Whatever the reason, jobs in many major sectors going unfilled.

  • There are few things more convenient than living near one’s workplace. The stress of commuting is minimal when the office is ten minutes away by car, and sunny days afford the opportunity for leisurely walks home at sunset while coworkers sit in bumper-to-bumper traffic.Baseball players have to travel the country during the regular season, so this scenario isn’t an option for six months out of the year. The one time when this scenario does, in fact, play out for them is during spring training, w

    There are few things more convenient than living near one’s workplace, but baseball players travel during the season. See where some of Major League Baseball’s stars live during spring training.

  • The Brookings Institution recently issued a report the compared per-capita gross domestic product and changes in employment data from 2010 to 2011 in 200 of the world’s largest metropolitan areas. The report found that these areas produced 48 percent of global output despite accounting for only 14 percent of the world’s population and employment.In other findings: Ninety percent of the fastest-growing economies were outside North America and western Europe; U.S. metropolitan areas outperformed t

    The Brookings Institution analyzed the financial data of the world’s largest metropolitan areas and uncovered some interesting findings. Check out which cities were the most productive.

  • unemployment_line3_2011_200.jpg

    There’s been a steady decline in the unemployment rate, but there’s a catch. The definition of “unemployed” only includes people who sought work in the last four weeks and excludes everyone else, including the underemployed and the long-term unemployed. What have they been doing since they fell off the radar?

  • Most of the time, people with demanding jobs want to leave them behind when quitting time arrives. Law clerks don’t want to file more briefs when they get home, actuaries don’t want to weigh financial risk from their comfy chairs, and accounts receivable clerks don’t want to send past-due invoices over dinner.However, some people have no choice but to bring aspects of the workplace to their day-to-day lives. Take the professional race car driver. Unless he or she lives above a convenience store,

    CNBC.com presents a list of current race car drivers and the cars they drive when they’re off duty and in no hurry to get anywhere at any particular time.

  • Unemployed man searching classifieds

    If you’ve scoured the classified ads, you’ve seen listings offering big money to the self-employed. Be your own boss and earn a fortune while clad in a bathrobe and flip-flops! Unfortunately, these ads often target people without jobs, and if they take the bait, they become trapped in a self-employment scam.

  • Paul-Allen-Billionaire-Sports-Team-Owners-CNBC.jpg

    Check out some of the billionaires from all over the world who have added a major sports team or two to their portfolios.

  • Unfinished mansion nicknamed "Versailles" up for sale "as is" by owner and timeshare tycoon David Siegel in Windermere, Florida.

    If you’re looking for some Orlando real estate, there’s a 90,000-square-foot mansion that might interest you. It’s the largest single-family home in the U.S., and it’s been on the market since 2010. It’s still under construction, and the “as-is” asking price for the unfinished home is $75 million.