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CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Daniel Bukszpan

Daniel Bukszpan
Special to CNBC.com

Daniel Bukszpan is a freelance contributor for CNBC.com. He has been a writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • Paul-Allen-Billionaire-Sports-Team-Owners-CNBC.jpg

    Check out some of the billionaires from all over the world who have added a major sports team or two to their portfolios.

  • Unfinished mansion nicknamed "Versailles" up for sale "as is" by owner and timeshare tycoon David Siegel in Windermere, Florida.

    If you’re looking for some Orlando real estate, there’s a 90,000-square-foot mansion that might interest you. It’s the largest single-family home in the U.S., and it’s been on the market since 2010. It’s still under construction, and the “as-is” asking price for the unfinished home is $75 million.

  • Just a few years ago, when foreclosures were coming fast and furious, some cities experienced more than their fair share of the pain. It stood to reason that the harder hit a city was, the less likely it was to make a hasty recovery. However, according to  the official site of the National Association of Realtors, some of the cities whose housing markets bore the brunt of the foreclosures are now leading the way toward recovery.Using data from Realtor.com, CNBC.com ranks the cities with the most

    When foreclosures were fast and furious, some cities experienced more than their share of the pain. Check out which American cities made this year’s list of the top 10 turnaround towns.

  • In January, 243,000 new private-sector jobs were created, bringing the unemployment rate to 8.3 percent. While these numbers aren’t exactly cause to pop the champagne corks just yet, they do offer evidence that the worst of the recession may be behind us, and better times may lie ahead.People returning to the workforce are unlikely to see the same job market that they knew before the recession. Some industries were hit harder than others, and while some jobs will make a return engagement in the

    It’s impossible to say what a fully recovered U.S. economy will look like, or how long it will take to get there. However, some sectors have begun to hire again.

  • Paula Deen

    Paula Deen has been teaching comfort food cooks since 2002. On January 17, 2012, she announced her diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. She also announced that she had become the spokesperson for the anti-diabetes drug Victoza. However, she’s hardly the only celebrity chef to make a questionable endorsement deal.

  • office_fired_200.jpg

    During the height of the recent financial crisis, a new term entered the lexicon of pop economists and established number-crunchers alike --- “man-cession.” This term refers to the loss of jobs among men, which occurred at a higher rate than it did among their female counterparts. However, things finally seem to be turning around.

  • gay_marriage_200.jpg

    Washington state may be the next American state to legalize gay marriage. It has the support of several major companies, but Microsoft is the most high-profile business to back it. Prominent figures in the business community support marriage equality, as was the case in New York, the last state to legalize it.

  • In 2010, the average U.S. worker had been with his or her employer for 4.4 years, according to the  That’s a far cry from the 20-year tenure that’s been the American worker’s ideal since time immemorial, and it’s an indicator of an uncomfortable reality -- jobs just don’t last like they used to.While it may not always be possible to stay with the same employer for a few decades, it’s still possible to stay with one profession over the long haul. No matter how the job market changes, and no matte

    Jobs just don’t last like they used to, but it’s still possible to stay with one profession over the long haul. Click to see what some of them are.

  • Contrary to popular belief, not all American citizens are required to move to Boca Raton when they retire. Sure, the climate is heavenly, the ocean water is alluring and the shoreline could hardly be more inviting. However, it’s not cheap, as the presence of  will attest, and the simple fact is that not all retirees have the means to live someplace like this.With this in mind,  a publication devoted to showing that “you can live better, for less, overseas,” just released its  By weighing such fa

    International Living just released its Retirement Index for 2012, which determines foreign destinations offering retirees a high standard of living at a low price. CNBC.com highlights 10 of them.

  • investor-clock-200.jpg

    Some people who are unprepared for retirement respond with a strategy known as “Hurry-Up Offense” retirement. This entails scrambling like mad at the 11th hour to find something to live on. It’s less than ideal, but sometimes a well-planned nest egg simply doesn’t exist.