Politics David Cameron

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  • UBS: How to play the UK elections

    Nick Nelson, head of global equity strategy at UBS, talks about how different businesses could be impacted by the UK election's outcome, adding that there are potential sector risks if the Labour party wins.

  • Sean Klimczak, senior managing director for private equity firm Blackstone Group, is shown on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange where the 2015 class of the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders rang the opening bell, March 27th, 2015.

    The World Economic Forum has named its "Young Global Leaders"--including many financial types--and expect them to be forces for global good.

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street in central London, March 18, 2015.

    A heady election season is underway in the U.K. Here's how traders are trying to profit.

  • Profiting off the British election

    An exciting U.K. election could mean big profits for traders. Kathy Lien of BK Asset Management and Andrew Burkly of Oppenheimer discuss with Amanda Drury.

  • UK business leaders back the Tories

    Bill O'Neill, head of the U.K. investment office at UBS Wealth Management, discusses the upcoming U.K. election.

  • UK elections: What can sway voters?

    As the UK elections get closer and more heated, CNBC's Catherine Boyle talks about how top business leaders are backing the Conservative party, and how voters could be swayed by headlines.

  • UK's Labour party: Britain can do better

    CNBC's Catherine Boyle reports on the Labour party's election campaign in the U.K., talking to to Shadow Health Secretary Andy Burnham about the National Health Service.

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street in central London, March 18, 2015.

    Cameron told the BBC that he would serve another five-year term if re-elected, but that he would not seek a third time around.

  • Miliband: A budget the public won't believe

    At the UK budget debate, Ed Miliband, leader of the opposition Labour party, criticizes the speech by George Osborne, U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer, as a Budget no one would believe.

  • UK budget had crowd-pleasing measures

    Rob Wood, chief UK economist at Berenberg, said there were a "few crowd-pleasing measures" in the UK budget speech.

  • UK budget: What was the stand out figure?

    Ruth Lea, economic adviser at Arbuthnot Banking Group, gives her reaction to the U.K. Budget.

  • Osborne: We will abolish annual tax return

    George Osborne, U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer, talks about the corporation tax in his annual Budget speech, adding that the annual tax return will be abolished.

  • Osborne: Britain is working again

    At the last Budget before May's general election, George Osborne, U.K. chancellor of the exchequer, reveals forecasts for the UK economy.

  • Osborne: We want to lower national debt

    In this year's Budget, U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, explains how the government plans to lower the national debt.

  • 'Britain is walking tall again': Osborne

    At this year's Budget, U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, discusses the progress the country's economy has made over the last five years.

  • UK 'must stick' to economic plan

    George Osborne, U.K. chancellor of the exchequer, says the U.K. must stick to its long-term economic plan, in this year's Budget statement.

  • Osbourne: A 'lucky' or 'failing' chancellor?

    When asked if the U.K. Chancellor is a "lucky" man, Chuka Umunna, shadow business secretary of the U.K. Labour party, explains why he prefers to use the word "failing."

  • Umunna: How to judge the UK budget

    Chuka Umunna, shadow business secretary of the U.K. Labour party, discusses what he and his party want to happen in the U.K budget today.

  • UK elections: Who do people trust?

    At a Labour party conference, CNBC's Wilfred Frost talks to delegates and members of the public about the upcoming U.K. general election.

  • UK's Labour party upbeat on business

    Toby Perkins, U.K. shadow minister for small business, says there's a "great deal more for government to do to support more businesses to grow."