Elections Democrats

  • The country is unequivocally better off today than it was four years ago, Costco co-founder and former CEO Jim Sinegal told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Wednesday.

  • With the economy sputtering, President Obama would like voters to believe he faces tougher challenges than any president since Franklin Roosevelt and needs two terms to turn things around. Sadly, the president's problems are so daunting only because his policies are not up to the task.

  • First Lady Michelle Obama speaks at the Democratic National Convention.

    First lady Michelle Obama acknowledged Tuesday that the change her husband sought in his White House campaign four years ago has proven difficult but urged voters to give him another term to fix the economy.

  • Democrats across America will be glued to their TV’s Wednesday eager to hear from Bill Clinton. And what he says is anybody’s guess, including the Obama's.

  • People cheer and wave American flags during day one of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena.

    Democrats approved a party platform at their national convention that echoes President Obama's call for higher taxes on wealthier Americans while backing same-sex marriage and abortion rights.

  • Unions and America are better off than they were when Obama took office, Richard Trumka, the head of the AFL-CIO told CNBC’s "Closing Bell"

  • President Barack  Obama’s four years in office have been a disappointment, Andrew Card, former Bush administration chief of staff, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Tuesday.

  • The Democratic convention will be far more critical of Mitt Romney and Republicans than the Republican convention was of the Democrats, real estate mogul Donald Trump told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

  • Gold coins and bar

    For the first time since the age of Reagan, the Republican Party is considering the gold standard.

  • Barack Obama

    Will Democrats find some way to make an enduring mark at this week's national convention? Check out five memorable moments from their earlier gatherings.

  • What Was Clint Eastwood Doing at the RNC?

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on what the Romney campaign is saying about Clint Eastwood's rambling monologue last night at the RNC. What was the damage to Mitt Romney? Eastwood's speech has been watched by 1.5 million people online. Romney's was watched by 58,000.

  • Mitt Romney and Barack Obama

    Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan plunge into the fall campaign on a two-track mission to convince Americans that the GOP nominee is the right man to fix the economy. President Obama gets ready for the big Democratic show.

  • American healthcare reform

    An Urban Institute study estimates that 3 percent of Americans younger than 65 -- about 7.3 million uninsured -- will be required to purchase coverage on their own or pay a penalty

  • Actor Clint Eastwood speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 30, 2012 in Tampa, Florida.

    The surprise speaker at the anointing  of Mitt Romney wound up surprising the GOP presidential candidate's camp and the millions who watched, including Ann Romney. Clint Eastwood also ignited the Twittersphere with his one-way conversation with an invisible President Barack Obama.

  • Presidential nominee Mitt Romney

    Did Mitt Romney make the economic sale at the Republican National Convention? Did he convince people who are living at the margin or unemployed and discouraged that he has the answers to the economy? "Frankly, I don’t think so," CNBC's Larry Kudlow says.

  • Actor Clint Eastwood speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention.

    Clint Eastwood, the Hollywood filmmaker who knows all about sticking to the script, turned in a bizarre, unscripted endorsement of Republican Mitt Romney.

  • The race between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, the Republican nominee, is showing some similarities to the 1980 contest between President Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.

  • It’s time to start talking about real fiscal policies and stop relying on the Federal Reserve to fix the country's problems, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman said Thursday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

  • At this point in the convention, you’d expect the delegates to be hoarse from screaming too much. That much is not surprising. But there have been a few unexpected moments and the press has missed a few things and overreacted at others.

  • The CEO of the world's largest advertising company, Sir Martin Sorrell, told CNBC he believes President Obama will be re-elected, even though GOP vice presidential hopeful Paul Ryan is impressive.