Elections Democrats

  • Rep. Joe Walsh, R-Ill., talks with supporter in his Cannon Building office after being sworn into the 112th Congress.

    It’s a bit of a dubious distinction, but freshman congressman Joe Walsh (R-Ill) says he’s proud to be the poorest member of the new crop of lawmakers on Capitol Hill. His net worth: negative $317,498.

  • The Poorest Congressman of All

    CNBC's Eamon Javers takes a look at where Congress' new freshmen class is putting their personal wealth and discusses money with the "poorest" member of the incoming freshman class of Congress.

  • Wisconsin Governor, Scott Walker

    About 700 people rallied Sunday in support of Republican Gov. Scott Walker and his anti-union plan to balance the budget — a demonstration meant to counter three weeks of large anti-Walker protests in and around the state Capitol.

  • Presidential Leadership by Nick Ragone

    “I quickly realized that there was a commonality to the 'transformative' decisions of the office that elucidate an interesting principle about leadership itself —one that is likely applicable to other disciplines, such as business and even sports,” writes the author in this Guest Blog.

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    Congressional Republicans face a serious risk of political backlash from pressing their budget-cutting agenda at a time when Americans are more concerned about jobs, a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll has found.

  • Rep. Ryan Paul from Wisconsin

    Republicans will present a plan to Congress next month to deal with the deficit by cutting entitlements, Rep. Paul Ryan, (R-Wisc.), chairman of the House Budget Committee, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    Lawmakers and governors in many states, faced with huge shortfalls in employee pension funds, are turning to a strategy that a lot of private companies adopted years ago, reports the New York Times.

  • Donald Kohn

    The recent spike in crude oil prices will be evident in headline inflation gauges but will have a "very limited effect on core" ones, former Fed vice chairman Don Kohn told CNBC Friday.

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    Fewer than half of the 2.1 million federal workers subject to a shutdown would be forced off the job if the Obama administration followed the path taken by presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton

  • Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    With a wary eye on Wisconsin, Republican leaders in several states are toning down the tough talk against public employee unions and, in some cases, abandoning anti-union measures altogether.

  • Wisconsin Governor, Scott Walker

    A prank caller pretending to be billionaire conservative businessman David Koch was able to have a lengthy conversation with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker about his strategy to cripple public employee unions, the governor's office confirmed Wednesday.

  • The collective bargaining process with public sector unions needs to be restructured to keep labor unions from “bankrupting states,” Sen. Ron Johnson, (R-Wisc.), told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Ambulance

    Believe it or not, there is some good news regarding health care reform. Legislators, employers and employees are actually in agreement on a number of important issues facing the industry. If only both political parties in our legislature could come together to implement changes that are not controversial, perhaps the remaining disagreeable items could be tackled later.

  • In order to help balance Wisconsin’s budget, the state’s Republican governor has proposed eliminating collective bargaining rights for most public employees, but Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, a Democrat, told CNBC he does not agree with the approach.

  • Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    The high-stakes fight in Wisconsin over union rights could have far-reaching effects on electoral politics in other states by helping solidify Republican power for years.

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    Republicans made good on a pledge to act to shrink government, but the vote sets the stage for a standoff with Senate Democrats and the White House that could lead to a shutdown, the New York Times reports.

  • Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    Protesters who have descended on Wisconsin's Capitol in hopes of halting a Republican effort to end a half-century of collective bargaining rights for public workers steeled themselves for a long fight, buoyed by Democrats' decision to flee to avoid the measure's near-certain passage.

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    By most measures, including key ones such as sales and jobs growth, the great growth engine of the American economy in the past four decades is still in a recovery mode—not an expansionary one., as is the manufacturing sector.

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    Having turned its focus from spending cuts to social issues and an assault on the Obama administration's regulatory agenda, a battle-weary House reconvenes Friday in hopes of wrapping up action on a big Republican spending bill that would impose sweeping cuts across domestic programs.

  • State pension funds, facing a potential multitrillion-dollar shortfall, find themselves in the center of a four-way battle: Employees and retirees expect to be paid their promised benefits; the pension systems have clear obligations but may not have the resources to pay them; politicians are looking for ways to resolve the underfunding and balance the burden among retirees and workers; and state taxpayers, challenged to provide for their own retirements, resent the additional tax load.