Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • America's Home Prices

    CNBC's Diana Olick has the latest data on the state of home prices across the U.S. as well as a look behind the numbers, with Kyle Lundstedt, LPS Applied Analystics.

  • for_sale_reduction.jpg

    For the past several months, Realtors across the nation have been reporting an ever-increasing number of cancelled existing home sale contracts. The latest Realtors Confidence Index now puts the cancellation rate at 20 percent, way up from the historical norm of around four to six percent.

  • bank_owned2_200.jpg

    Look for most of 2011's trends to continue; home prices will fall while foreclosures, delinquencies and rental prices will rise.

  • What's a prediction without a little courage, bravado or risk-taking? Oh yeah, good instincts and analytics also helps. We've culled some 15 brilliant predictions from the dozens offered by our anchors, reporters, editors and bloggers at CNBC. Enjoy and let us us know what you think.

    These predictions are bold all right. Some may even be outrageous. The financial world, however, is full of big surprises. Remember, you heard it first here.

  • foreclosure_paperwork_stamp_200.jpg

    After a year of fruitless negotiations between major U.S. banks and the nation's state attorneys general, Massachusetts has filed the first major lawsuit over so-called "robo-signing" foreclosure processing.

  • Massachusetts AG Sues BofA

    New details are out on the first major state lawsuit against five big banks over foreclosure processing, with CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • toy_home_lock_200.jpg

    Foreclosures are setting new records again, this time not in their overall numbers, but in the time it is taking for all of these properties to be processed through the legal system. The average loan in foreclosure has now been delinquent a record 631 days.

  • home_for_sale_200.jpg

    At first glance it seems like a huge and hopeful headline: Pending home sales, based on contracts signed, rose 10.4 percent in October from September. It certainly gives the impression that buyers are hopping off the fence and into the market. Well, let's not get ahead of ourselves.

  • new_home_sold_200.jpg

    Potential home buyers came out of the woodwork in October, signing contracts to buy existing homes at a higher-than expected pace.

  • reduced_price_sign2_200.jpg

    Home prices across the nation are now right back where they were at the beginning of 2003. All that was gained is largely now lost, and the effect on home ownership could continue for decades.