Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Sold sign

    Sales of existing homes in October beat expectations, registering a gain of 1.4 percent from the previous month, but that number masks a market that is heavily weighted to the low end. Realtors say they expect sales to bounce around the same levels for the rest of the year, with a very slight annual gain from 2010.

  • capitol_building_wallst_mainst.jpg

    Wednesday morning House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Ranking Member Elijah Cummings issued a press release detailing a letter he sent to the conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, FHFA Acting Director Ed DeMarco.

  • Home Builders Sentiment Index Higher

    Is there hopes of a housing turnaround? CNBC's Diana Olick reports the National Association of Home Builders Sentiment Index just hit its highest level since 2010.

  • couple_looking_at_house_200.jpg

    Just over 11 million Americans moved between March of 2010 and March of 2011, according to a new report from the U.S. Census. That might sound like a lot, but it's actually a record low.

  • home_building3.jpg

    Despite rising foreclosures and weak consumer confidence, the nation's home builders are seeing signs of hope in housing. Home builder confidence rose for the second straight month in November, according to the National Association of Home Builders' monthly sentiment survey, but builders warn it is still far below a positive reading.

  • Raising FHA Loan Limits

    Congress agreed on a plan to increase the maximum size of mortgage loans that can be insured by the already financially troubled FHA, with CNBC's Diana Olick. Joseph Gyourko, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School professor also weighs in.

  • housing_government_200.jpg

    On the same day that independent auditors released a report showing the government mortgage insurer, the FHA, has even less cash reserves now than it did last year to cover potential losses, Congress is readying to vote on a measure that would increase the FHA's market share.

  • house_federal.jpg

    The government's mortgage insurer is coming dangerously close to holding no excess cash reserves for loan losses.

  • home_handcuff_200.jpg

    Shame on the Republican candidates for president. Shame on them for showing up at debate specifically targeting the U.S. economy with not one credible, rational, even reputable notion of what to do about the nation's housing mess.

  • Foreclosure Sign

    After a year of delays and denials in the so-called "robo-signing" foreclosure paperwork scandal, loan servicers and judges alike are putting the process back in place.