Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.


  • Foreclosure

    Fraudulent foreclosure practices, a.k.a. “robo-signing,” uncovered now nearly two years ago, opened a new wound in the foreclosure crisis that was in the process of healing.

  • commercial_real_estate_sign.jpg

    It should come as no surprise that the commercial real estate sector most sensitive to unemployment is office; that’s where people work. Slow job growth has helped a little, but really only in the trophy, coastal markets, so it may come as a surprise that investors are suddenly bullish on the sector.

  • apartment_rent.jpg

    Tight supply and heavy demand for apartments means rents are increasing across the country, and will likely increase more. But is this the right time to buy into this market?

  • Rental Rate is on the Rise

    CNBC's Diana Olick has the details on a new report that shows apartment rentals are accelerating, showing the largest quarterly increase since before the recession.

  • Hawaii Luxury Home

    Hammers are coming down on the high end again, as the ritziest in real estate finally come out of hiding. Vacation homes in some of the most coveted locales are seeing price gains again, so potential buyers are now looking to builders. The question is, where are you getting the most bang for your big bucks?

  • Swimming Pool

    Despite a slow and cautious recovery in housing, the nation's big public home builders appear to be gaining ground...and building on it.

  • stethoscope_money_200.jpg

    Whatever the Supreme Court decides, health care REITs would see a modest impact, depending on how heavily invested they are in the different health-real estate subsets, analysts say.

  • homes_for_sale2_200.jpg

    The number of home buyers signing contracts to buy existing homes jumped nearly six percent in May to the highest level since April of 2010.

  • home_for_sale_200.jpg

    For the first time in seven months, home prices as recorded on the S&P/Case Shiller Home price Indices saw month-to month gains. The press release even referred to it as a “spike.”

  • for-sale-sign-flowers-200.jpg

    Sales of newly built homes in May hit the highest level in two years, and the median price of those homes was 5.6 percent higher than it was a year ago. The number of new homes now expected to sell in 2012 is 369,000. Great news…sort of.