Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.


  • bank_owned2_200.jpg

    Foreclosure activity in April fell nationally to the lowest level since the summer of 2007, but government intervention and the recent $25 billion mortgage servicing settlement are now changing the face of the crisis.

  • Foreclosure

    A new report came out this morning with a curious headline: “Foreclosure Activity Declines, Hurting Investors.” I read it twice. You would think declines in foreclosure activity would be a good thing, that is, would help, not hurt. Not in this bizarre housing market.

  • home_building4.jpg

    Builder confidence jumped five points in May, which is a sign that the nation’s homebuilders are feeling far better again, after an unusually warm winter wreaked havoc with the usual traffic and sales trends.

  • Responsible Housing Borrowers?

    President Obama is in Nevada touting mortgage refinancing for "responsible homeowners," but CNBC's Diana Olick reports some borrowers may not be so responsible.

  • drowning_home.jpg

    President Obama has visited a “responsible” couple who owe more on their mortgage than their Nevada home is currently worth. But did they act responsibly?

  • Mortgage

    The Realtors say it, the home builders say it, and now the chairman of the Federal Reserve is saying it: “Some creditworthy borrowers are still having trouble getting a mortgage.”

  • The Mortgage Gamble

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports on a widespread, but controversial new move by Bank of America to try and keep thousands of homes from foreclosure. CNBC's Rick Santelli weighs in.

  • Bank of America flag

    A select group of struggling mortgage borrowers are about to get an offer that sounds too good to be true. Executives at Bank of America admit that, as they begin mailing 200,000 letters offering certain customers mortgage principal reduction.

  • Short sales (selling the home for less than the value of the loan) are rising across the nation, and while they have yet to overtake foreclosure numbers in Atlanta, they are in fact up 120 percent from a year ago, according to RealtyTrac.

  • House Flipping Returns in Atlanta

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports on Bruce Carlisle from Georgia Residential Partners, who is buying foreclosed homes, and selling them after investing anywhere between $15,000-$25,000 into fixing them up.