Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Foreclosure Sign

    I thought I would share a response to yesterday's blog on the Obama Administration considering selling Fannie and Freddie's foreclosed properties in bulk to private investors. Rick Sharga used to work, and speak, for RealtyTrac, a well-known foreclosure sale site and tracker. He recently jumped ship to join Carrington Mortgage Holdings, which does everything from asset management to residential mortgage origination, servicing and property management.

  • Foreclosure

    What's weighing on confidence are still-falling home prices, and what's pushing those home prices down are foreclosures. That's why the Obama Administration is pushing a potential plant to auction off foreclosed properties in bulk to investors.

  • Sold sign

    Sales of newly built homes in September came in well over expectations, and stocks of the big builders took a little tick up on the news. They then dropped off pretty precipitously, as analysts weighed in on what is behind that nice headline number.

  • drowning_home.jpg

    "President Obama is taking action." At least that's what the blog on the WhiteHouse.gov says today in describing the president's trip to Las Vegas. "We can't wait to help homeowners," it goes.

  • Inside Obama's Housing Aid Plan

    As President Obama faces push-back on his jobs bill, he is now taking another crack at helping to rebuild the housing market. CNBC's Diana Olick reports.

  • Most Promising Housing Proposals

    A look at the key proposals to fix the housing mess in Washington, with CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • homes_for_sale_200.jpg

    Home sales are bouncing along the bottom, home prices still haven't hit bottom, and government proposals to juice the housing market are simply falling flat. The one bright spot in the hardest hit markets is foreign investment.

  • Interest Rates vr. Refinancing

    One weekly report does not a trend make, but today's mortgage application survey should serve up a good dose of reality to all of those state attorneys general and Obama administration officials touting a grand new refinance program for underwater borrowers.

  • foreclosure_paperwork_stamp_200.jpg

    Despite the furor, the threats, and the big bank blame game, there is still no settlement between the "robo-signers" and the fifty state attorneys general who promised payback for borrowers. Now, as talks are allegedly in their final phase, according to a source very close to the process, the AG's have thrown in another wrench, or perhaps they're throwing a bone.

  • home_building1.jpg

    Despite sluggish summer sales, confidence among the nation's home builders is gaining strength, posting its largest gain since April 2010, when the now-expired home buyer tax credit brought more buyers into the market.