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Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Sell the Homebuilders?

    Barclays downgraded several home builders, including Toll Brothers and KB Home. CNBC's Diana Olick has the details.

  • Homebuilders Take a Hit

    Home prices jumped in December, but home builders aren't feeling the same high. Stephen Kim, Barclays homebuilding analyst, offers insight.

  • Housing Bubble Take 2?

    Home prices are up over 8 percent in December from 1 year ago, reports CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • U.S. home prices are suddenly soaring again and raising some serious red flags.

  • One company found that energy usage in the US drops by more than 5% during the game and as much as 7.5% during the half-time show, even though it would take 10 coal-fired power plants to fire all the televisions being watched.

  • More than half of the top 200 U.S. housing markets saw foreclosure numbers rise, according to a new report, but not where you might expect; investors should take note.

  • Olick: 2013's Best and Worst Foreclosure Deals

    After improving in 2011, foreclosures ramped up again in 2012, and will likely continue to rise as banks clear out backlogs of distressed loans. More than half of the top 200 U.S. housing markets saw foreclosure numbers rise, according to a new report from RealtyTrac, reports CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • Death of the Refi?

    Refinances dropped 10 percent this week, reports CNBC's Diana Olick. Mortgage bankers said the rate on the 30-year fixed moved up from 3.62 percent to 3.67 percent.

  • 4 ways to pay off your mortgage earlier

    A mortgage analyst says, "The thought is that there are a bunch of homeowners on the fence who haven't refi'd who will all jump in thinking they will miss out. The theory is 100 percent nonsense."

  • Women Driving Rental Boom

    Women are getting married later, having kids later and out of wedlock, all prompting them to seek the convenience of large, full-service rental apartment buildings, reports CNBC's Diana Olick.