Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Foreclosure

    What today's foreclosure headlines don't say is that while the percentage of the market that's distressed rose from a year ago, the actual number of distressed sales fell. The share only went up because the number of non-distressed sales fell, leaving the total pool smaller. And there's the biggest problem in housing today

  • Florida_home_200.jpg

    Higher priced homes are taking a hit and the outlook for them is worse than the overall market. That will have ramifications for recovery.

  • New homes aren't selling, new delinquencies are rising, and inventories of existing homes are way too high...Some analysts out there think that some builders are well-positioned to profit going forward.

  • couple_looking_at_house_200.jpg

    The last, best hope for housing right now is robust investor activity. Unfortunately, investors may be pulling back on the housing market, despite a surge in rental demand and prices.

  • Property Tax

    As mortgage rates hit new record lows, refinance applications have surged accordingly. That, as always, is leading economists to talk once again about what the effect of all that refinancing might be on the greater economy.

  • homes_for_sale2_200.jpg

    July's existing home sales came in well below expectations. While analysts called for an increase, based on several months of rising pending home sales (contracts signed), they did not give enough weight to the three biggest issues plaguing the market, starting with tough credit conditions.

  • Florida_home_200.jpg

    The deadline for ending temporarily higher loan limits at Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the FHA is October 1st, but they are effectively ended now. A Wells Fargo spokesman confirms, "August 15th was the deadline for applications and rate locks for FHA and conventional conforming loans with balances above the limits we expect will be in place after September 30th."

  • Drywall

    Builders are on track to construct the fewest single family homes in history this year. Total housing starts in July were down 1.7 percent, month to month, which may not sound like a lot, but when you break the number down, you see the problem.

  • Nantucket

    What shut these so-called "hedge fund wives" wallets was not lack of cash but lack of confidence, and that is the same sentiment keeping potential home buyers out of the market today.

  • foreclosure_chained_200.jpg

    Just as we saw a double dip in home prices, we may be seeing another surge in foreclosures.