Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

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  • house_money_200.jpg

    Yesterday I had the great opportunity to moderate a symposium on mortgage liquidity with a pretty heavy panel of mortgage bankers and industry executives. I knew they would be guarded in their answers...and they were guarded, until I opened up the floor to the Realtors, who hammered them hard on foreclosures, short sales, and mortgage credit for independent contractors like themselves.

  • Negative Equity Risks Rise

    The percentage of underwater mortgages has hit a new high. Will that accelerate foreclosures? CNBC's Diana Olick has the details.

  • home_underwater2_200.jpg

    Today Zillow.com reported a new high in negative equity: 28.4 percent of single family homes with a mortgage. That's a national average, but the numbers are far worse in some of the nation's big metros.

  • Foreclosure

    Home prices have double dipped nationwide, now lower than their March 2009 trough, according to a new report from Clear Capital.

  • No Title_38346682

    Barely a few minutes after reading an article in the Wall Street Journal about banks finally opening the "spigot for commercial real-estate," the folks over at Trepp issued their monthly report on the delinquency rate for commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS); let's just say it isn't good.

  • Foreclosure

    For the first time in years, the man who quantifies the foreclosure crisis got to report some good news. This month he got to report a drop in mortgage delinquencies, down more than 11 percent month-over month, to the lowest level since 2008.

  • new_built_home_AP.jpg

    Several of the nation's largest public home builders reported earnings this week, and I was struck by the way their CEOs spoke of the current state of housing.

  • pliers_200.jpg

    Today the National Association of Home Builders put out its quarterly remodeling index, which rose to the highest level since 2006. What does remodeling say about home buying? I think it says two things.

  • Home For Rent

    I spent this morning at a conference by Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies. They released a survey showing one in four renters, low and middle income, are spending more than half their income on rent and utilities. That's about 10 million households.

  • Sold sign

    Thanks to all the streaming feeds of constant news I'm subjected to, I just clicked on a CNBC story titled, "Four Years Later, Housing Market Shows Signs of Life." I was curious, seeing as I write about housing for CNBC, and I didn't write that. It's a Reuters piece, and I don't buy it.