Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • bernake_ben_testify_200.jpg

    Anyone worried that the expiration of higher loan limits at Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the FHA will have a negative effect on the housing market by raising the cost of home ownership,  can be rest assured the chairman of the Federal Reserve is fine with it

  • mortgage_loan_statement_200.jpg

    Yesterday a lot of folks, including myself, were slightly incensed at the announcement by mortgage insurer PMI that it is launching a pilot program offering cash bonuses to borrowers who stay current on their mortgage payments.

  • home_of_future_200.jpg

    As home values continue to fall and more borrowers fall into a negative equity position on their home loans, those who stand to lose, banks and investors, are working to keep borrowers current.

  • Every now and then you need to take a step back and put the housing market into perspective, take a break from all the monthly motions and commotions, stress and distress.

  • Fannie Mae's Surprisng Survey

    CNBC's Diana Olick with the results from the Federal National Mortgage Association survey.

  • Remember how we all blamed investor/flippers using faulty financing for the housing crash? You know, these are all the bad guys who ran up home prices to their own profit, with no concern for the inevitable fallout; they colluded with overzealous, borderline blind, lenders who gave anybody and everybody a loan with no attention paid to their ability to repay said loan.

  • Does anyone remember when the rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage was up around 8 percent? I do. Perhaps that's why it continues to stun me that a tiny shift in our now ultra low rates can have a huge effect on consumer activity, namely refinancing.

  • mansion_suburb_200.jpg

    If we're going to return to a "normal" housing market, we need move-up buyers. Yes, the distress is on the low end, but the mid range is stalled, and that's not healthy.

  • Realty Check Update

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports Phoenix home sales hit a six year high in May; loan limits are unlikely to push house prices down further and, in California, housing permits for multi-family units are up sharply.

  • Mortgage

    The US Treasury just released its latest "scorecard" on the state of the government's housing bailout. The numbers are still weak, compared to the overall picture.