Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • government_home_loan_200.jpg

    The response to President Obama's recent proposal to refinance more borrowers into lower interest rate mortgages was at best underwhelming and at worst scathing.

  • Property Tax

    If more Americans can save more money by refinancing their mortgages (likely their single largest debt), and more Americans can potentially buy a home, given the low rates, then why are they so pessimistic about housing going forward as well as their personal finances?

  • refinance_sign.jpg

    The latest weekly mortgage application survey released today by the Mortgage Bankers Association makes no sense. Mortgage applications fell 4.9 percent overall, with applications to purchase a home essentially flat and applications to refinance down 6.3 percent. The part that doesn't make sense is that refi's have fallen for the second straight week, at the same time that mortgage rates have fallen for the second straight week. Lower rates usually spur more refi's, not fewer.

  • front_door_200.jpg

    What's the bright side to a 200 point drop in the Dow? Yet another rush to Treasuries that pushes the 10-year yield below two percent; that, in turn, means even lower mortgage rates, right? Maybe not this time.

  • home_handcuff_200.jpg

    At face value, the lawsuit makes sense; the role of the FHFA is to limit losses to Fannie and Freddie.

  • Foreclosure

    With home prices still falling, new mortgage delinquencies rising again, millions of mortgages already in the foreclosure pipeline, and consumer confidence in the housing market near nil, President Obama is expected to include some new housing fix in his post-Labor Day speech to the nation on jobs and the economy.

  • home_handcuff_200.jpg

    National housing recessions are pretty rare, and the one we're in right now is arguably unprecedented, and consequently hard to track and predict.

  • Woman doing bills

    A borrower in Michigan recently received a letter from his mortgage servicer, CitiMortgage. It offers to discuss foreclosure alternatives, including potential eligibility for the government's mortgage bailout program. It is clear, succinct, and gives several phone numbers and contact information.

  • Housing on the Rebound?

    Home sales fell last month but there are a few bright spots. CNBC's Diana Olick has the details.

  • Foreclosure

    What today's foreclosure headlines don't say is that while the percentage of the market that's distressed rose from a year ago, the actual number of distressed sales fell. The share only went up because the number of non-distressed sales fell, leaving the total pool smaller. And there's the biggest problem in housing today