Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Mortgage

    The US Treasury just released its latest "scorecard" on the state of the government's housing bailout. The numbers are still weak, compared to the overall picture.

  • Home prices in May were down 7.4 percent year-over-year, according to a new report from CoreLogic. This is the first of the May numbers, as S&P Case Shiller, which released earlier this week, looks back two months.

  • Today's bullish report on pending home sales came with a caveat from the National Association of Realtors that if banks began lending to more creditworthy borrowers, recovery in the housing sector would be faster.

  • for_sale_signs_AP2.jpg

    How do I loathe home price day? Let me count the ways. This month is particularly frustrating, because the big headline from S&P/Case Shiller was that home prices rose for the first time in eight months. Okay, yes, from March to April, with no seasonal adjustments, home prices rose barely, less than one percent, in the nation's top 20 housing markets. When you seasonally adjust those numbers, the prices fall.

  • Florida_home_200.jpg

    As I sit here, less than 24 hours from the next release of the much-followed monthly S&P/Case Shiller Home Price Index, I'm confronted with all kinds of varying data and hypotheses on the future track of home prices. Particularly interesting to me is a new breakdown, by Capital Economics (which watches our market from Toronto, Canada), on how prices are falling faster at the low end than the high end.

  • mortgage_loan_statement_200.jpg

    Today the National Association of Home Builders released a study claiming that lowering the loan limits at Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), "will reduce housing demand and place downward pressure on home prices in major housing markets."

  • Home Construction

    Sales of newly built homes fell around 2 percent in May from the previous month, but that was a little better than expectations, given the lousy home builder sentiment number we got this month and the huge supply of competing existing and distressed properties. But let's put this monthly move in perspective, shall we?

  • Foreclosure

    The so-called "shadow inventory" of residential properties is falling, according to a new report from CoreLogic. "The decline was due to fewer new delinquencies and the high level of distressed sales, which helped reduce the number of outstanding distressed loans," according to the report.

  • bank_owned2_200.jpg

    The share of distressed sales in May, that is foreclosed properties and short sales (when the property is sold for less than the value of the loan), fell to 31 percent of all sales from 37 percent in April. Investors, who purchase a large share of these distressed properties, also represented a smaller share in May. So what's going on?

  • for_sale_signs_AP2.jpg

    Sales of existing homes fell 3.8 percent in May, not as deep a drop as some had forecast, to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.81 million units.