×

Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • fsbo_200.jpg

    The revisions don’t change sales on the ground today, but it remains to be seen how the perception of a deeper housing crash will affect home sales, prices and distress in the future.

  • Rental Demand Drives Housing Market

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports good news for the rental market and has the latest data released from the Commerce Department.

  • Sold sign

    We already know the housing crash was bad, perhaps the worst in history; tomorrow we will learn that it’s worse than we thought.

  • couple_looking_at_house_200.jpg

    Not since the spring of 2008 have the nation’s homebuilders felt this good about the potential for new business. An industry association survey showed that builder sentiment rose for the third straight month in December.

  • Home Builder Confidence Improves

    Home builders sentiment remains negative, but is improving, reports CNBC's Diana Olick. "The index is now at 21, but remember, 50 is the line between positive and negaitve," Olick says.

  • A home is advertised for sale at a foreclosure auction in Pasadena, California.

    Despite a seasonal slowdown in overall foreclosure activity, and a process still bogged down and backed up by the "robo-signing" processing scandal, the U.S real estate market is about to be hit by another surge of bank repossessions, according to a new report from the online foreclosure sale site RealtyTrac.

  • house-for-sale-us-flag-200.jpg

    Housing may have been the catalyst for the Great Recession, but it is not number one on America’s fix-it list for our next President.

  • Lender Fees to Pay for Tax Cut?

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports on proposed plans to raise Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac lender fees and pass the money on to the U.S. Treasury to help pay for the payroll tax cut. The housing lobby is fighting the idea.

  • Home and Taxes

    At face value, it seems like an easy, albeit creative way to pay for the extension of the payroll tax cut. Raise the fees that banks pay mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to guarantee home loans.

  • Mortgage application

    Ask the Realtors, the Builders, even the Housing Reporters, and they'll all tell you that the biggest impediments to housing's recovery are higher credit underwriting standards.