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Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Mortgage Refis Drop

    CNBC's Diana Olick has new numbers on mortgage refis and what that might mean for the housing recovery.

  • The average rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage is up about a half a percentage point since the middle of February, when they hit a record low. Mortgage refinances, however, dropped 24 percent in the same period of time. That's a huge reaction to a small move from a record low.

  • Couple looking at properties in window of real estate agency.

    The American dream of owning a home is still alive and well, but a large percentage of Americans today feel that for now, renting might be the better option.

  • kitchen-remodeling-200.jpg

    As the wider economy begins to strengthen, and Americans start to feel better about their current and future finances, they are dipping their toes back into the housing waters, in the form of remodeling.

  • home_sales7.jpg

    The housing market is ahead of where we were, but rising foreclosures will put added pressure on this market, and we may not be out of the woods yet.

  • Bank of America branch, New York City.

    Bank of America, the nation's second-largest lender, is launching a pilot program this week that will offer a limited number of customers behind on their mortgages to transition from owner to renter.

  • home_handcuff_200.jpg

    The idea of the President's plan was not only to help underwater borrowers stay afloat with payments but also to put more money in their pockets, which in turn could serve as a wider economic stimulus. That’s all well and good when interest rates are hovering around record lows. Now, thanks to an improving economy, mortgage rates are rising.

  • signing_loans.jpg

    Rates have moved a good quarter of a percent in the past few weeks but most analysts don't think they'll go much higher.

  • Housing Sales Expectations Rise

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports that homebuilder sentiment is double what it was six months ago.

  • sold-home-and-flowers-200.jpg

    As if we really needed a reminder that today’s housing market is still very fragile, the first installment in a slew of housing data to be released this week came in below expectations.