Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Foreclosed Home

    We've been reporting a lot of anecdotal information about life after the home buyer tax credit, but now we're starting to get some numbers.

  • Greenwich, Connecticut home

    Thanks to a slightly bizarre story about a New Jersey couple putting their almost-finished home on the market for $68 million, I decided to take a look at the luxury home market today.

  • At about 1am today, after all their data had run through whatever data system it runs through, they learned that the office vacancy rate had turned for the first time since Q3 2007.

  • Home For Rent

    Now that the tax credit is gone, and employment is slowly improving, renters have to look at the equation again locally and see if it all adds up financially. A new report from Trulia.com tries to do that for you, but I found some really surprising results in it.

  • Foreclosed Home

    This morning executives at Bank of America rolled out their new "Principal Reduction Enhancement" program, which is an earned principal forgiveness plan for borrowers behind on their mortgages and whose loans are at least 20 percent underwater in value.

  • Reduced Price

    Everybody take a nice long look at today's Pending Home Sales Index from the National Association of Realtors, because it's just about the last positive picture we're going to see for a while.

  • home_sales8.jpg

    Obviously, given the sheer number of troubled borrowers (approximately 6 million currently delinquent nationwide) there are ample opportunities for mistakes to be made.

  • home_sales3.jpg

    While sales of existing homes shot up across most of the nation in April, they fell in the West, down 6.2 percent.

  • housing_builders.jpg

    The New Home Sales report today was nothing short of exceptional. The number beat all expectations and beat them by a lot. So are the builders back? Not so fast.

  • home_sales3.jpg

    For those hoping to see the same bump up in sales and prices that the first "first-time home buyer tax credit" produced last fall, the signs are already disappointing. It's very hard to judge today's market, given how so many of the surveys and "indicators" are so far backward looking.