Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

  • Today the Mortgage Bankers Association put out a revision in its 2009 originations forecast. A big revision. A $700 billion revision.

  • With mortgage interest rates creeping higher again - a new idea is floating around industry associations and Capitol Hill. It’s another home buyer tax credit.

  • mortgage_apps.jpg

    Is it just me, or does anyone else find the weekly mortgage applications survey from the Mortgage Bankers Association particularly troubling today? I’ve been watching this indicator closely over the last few weeks, as mortgage interest rates rose. I of course expected refis to fall, and they did, and they continue to fall, bringing down the total number.

  • housing_starts.jpg

    So my first thought was: there’s got to be something wrong with this number. A 17 percent surge in housing starts didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me at first, but after talking to my minions I’m getting now getting the picture.

  • Home Construction

    After what seemed like a turnaround in confidence, the nation's home builders cited new concerns this month; the National Association of Home Builders' monthly sentiment survey slipped one point.

  • forclosure.jpg

    Yesterday RealtyTrac, an online foreclosure sale site, reported that the number of properties receiving foreclosure filings fell 6 percent in May from the previous month, while they are still up 18 percent from May of 2008.

  • Toll Brothers

    About three months ago, as the unemployment rate began to really spike, it became all the corporate rage to offer “peace of mind” should you lose your job. That came in the form of various insurance-esque guarantees.

  • home_loans2.jpg

    You’ve probably never heard of it; I know I hadn’t until I read a New York Times article about it a few months ago, but think of it like that enormous warehouse you see at the end of "Raiders of the Lost Ark", where important artifacts and documents go to die.

  • Yesterday, in a speech to the American Bankers Association, the Comptroller of the Currency, John Dugan, suggested that the next area of concern in the mortgage market may be “reverse mortgages."

  • President Barack Obama

    For most Americans, the tick up in the rate on the 30-year-fixed from just under 5 percent to around 5.5 to 5.75 percent doesn’t mean much, other than yet another bump on the road to potentially buying a home.