×

Indexes Dow Jones Industrial Average

  • While investors hoped that a new year would bring better results, a plethora of downbeat earnings reports, poor corporate outlooks, gloomy economic data, and heightened concerns over the health of many large financial firms plagued the markets in January.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average won’t find a secure base until it sheds another 1,000 points, which it could do before March, but that will signal the capitulation is over, Alpesh Patel, principal from Praefinium Group, told CNBC.

  • "As goes January, so goes the year" is a common adage on the street.  If that is the case, we are in for a tough rest of the year for the markets.

  • On a week dominated by earnings, the economic stimulus plan and discussions over a government-run "bad bank," the major US markets were flat to negative on the week.  The Dow and S&P 500 marked their worst January on record, each dropping over 8% for the month. 

  • 2009 Superbowl

    Last year, I pointed out that the market historically has outperformed when an original NFL team wins the Super Bowl and lags when an original AFL team wins.  This year is special then.  Both the Cardinals and the Steelers were members of the original NFL before the merger with the AFL in 1970.  So either way, an original NFL team will win this year.  Of course the NY Giants upset of New England last year did not translate well for the markets...

  • Following a Historic-Presidential Inauguration, marked by heighten volatility in the markets, all major US indices finish the week in negative territory. 

  • Happy Birthday By The Numbers!  Today is the first anniversary of the launch of By The Numbers.  We debuted in January 2008 as a top ten CNBC.com blog, and shortly after, were awarded an internal recognition as the "Fastest Growing Blog."

  • The battered stock market is due for a “flash-fire” rally which could match the stellar recovery-run put in place after the crash of 1987 finally bottomed, Bill Spiropoulos, market strategist from CoreStates Capital Advisors, told CNBC.

  • Stocks clawed their way back from a midday rout as banks surged and investors relaxed after the Treasury Secretary nomination hearing ended.

  • Stocks clawed their way back after paring earlier gains amid worries about the confirmation hearing of the Treasury Secretary nominee.

  • Stocks opened higher Wednesday as investors hope President Barack Obama's economic team will bring clarity to the markets.

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open for Wall Street Wednesday as investors hope President Barack Obama's economic team will bring clarity to the markets.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average could sink towards 7,500 points if it doesn’t start to rise very quickly, Sandy Jadeja, chief market strategist at ODL Securities, told CNBC.

  • Stocks ended a dismal week on an up note as investors took some defensive positions in stocks like McDonald's amid nagging worries about the health of banks.

  • On Friday, the US markets managed to close in positive territory for the day, however, they turned in their second-down-week in a row losing almost 3% or greater across the board, led by the S&P 500 Index.

  • Stocks were back up in a yo-yo session as investors took some defensive positions in stocks like McDonald's amid nagging worries about the health of banks.

  • The Dow could reach 12,000 by March as “gloom and doom” creeps out of the market, Ben Lichtenstein,  President of Tradersaudio.com, said on Squawk Box.

  • Futures rallied on the back of the Bank of America bailout Friday, with investors hoping the government will do all in its power to save big institutions from collapsing.

  • Yesterday's 250 point sell-off in the Dow was the sixth day in a row of losses, the longest losing streak since October 10, 2008 when the Dow lost 22% over an eight day stretch.  Since the start of the year, the Dow is down 6.6%, its worst Jan 1 - Jan 14 stretch ever.

  • Over the past few days, the markets have been weighed down by weak economic data, downbeat corporate earnings forecasts, and concerns that many financial firms may post large quarterly losses in the upcoming weeks. Now at its lowest level since December 1, the Dow is down for its sixth straight session – its longest losing streak since the beginning of October.