Weather Earthquakes

  • Warren Buffett

    The nuclear disaster in Japan is likely to have major effects on US energy policy, according to billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

  • Dollars and Yen

    The G-7's intervention has halted the yen's rise, but what happens next isn't clear. Here's how to trade.

  • Hollywood sign

    Despite the upheaval roiling the markets, Wall Street analysts continue to issue upbeat reports about media companies, and even the negative reports don't mention the headlines — they simply don't have the exposure to Japan and the rest of the market instability as many other sectors.

  • charts_money_140.jpg

    Terrible weather in January, a spike in gasoline prices in February and a devastating earthquake in Japan in March: any of those three factors can bring a hiccup in earnings and taken together it seems more likely than not that they will.

  • Yen

    In the wake of the crisis in Japan, the yen has strengthened dramatically, which is counterintuitive. Usually, when a country's economy is expected to weaken, so does its currency, but  Japan is a unique case.

  • Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    There is no way to underscore the depth of the tragedy we see playing out before us as the potential of a nuclear nightmare of unprecedented proportions unfolds before our eyes. And while it pales in comparison to the human toll, the Japanese economy is also surely facing a period of great challenge.

  • 2011 Honda Odyssey

    In the depths of a panic-driven stocks sell-off this week, an options investor was making a big bullish bet on Japanese automaker Honda Motor .

  • Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

  • The yen is settling into a range after coordinated intervention by G-7 countries, but there's plenty of excitement elsewhere — it's time for your FX Fix.

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    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • Yen coins and banknotes

    The G7’s agreement on joint action to push the yen lower has, so far, had the desired effect, reversing much of this week’s gain for the yen and boosting equities in Tokyo.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • Knee-jerk reactions to catastrophes often fall wide of the mark, Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.

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    Multinational companies in several sectors are warning of supply-chain disruptions, after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan, the Financial Times reports.

  • In this satellite view, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power plant after the massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

    Readings from American flights over the stricken nuclear plant show that the worst of the contamination has not spewed past the 18-mile range established by Japan. The NYT reports.

  • Japanese Self Defence Force's CH-47 Chinook helicopter holding more than seven tons water each with large buckets from the sea

    Better news from the Japan crisis today, as the nuclear power company Tepco appears to be on track to complete a power line to the Fukushima nuclear power plant this afternoon Tokyo time.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Japan will get what it wants from the Group of Seven teleconference of finance ministers and central bankers Thursday night, but G-7 sources say the group is still waiting for Japan to ask.

  • Following the disasters in Japan, trader Steve Cortes on Thursday said China is in "a lot of trouble." Here's how he recommends trading it.

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    While we await the outcome of the nuclear disaster in Japan, we could be witnessing a structural change in the global financial markets.

  • Traders point to Japanese investors repatriating assets as a significant cause of the yen's dramatic rise. Really?