Weather Earthquakes

  • Jean-Claude Trichet

    The crisis in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people will not have an effect on the European Central Bank's interest rate policy, Manfred Schepers, vice-president finance and chief financial officer for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, told CNBC.

  • A school pupil receives a graduation certificate during the graduation ceremony at Takkon Elementary School on March 22, 2011 in Ofunato, Iwate, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,0

    Schools in Japan begin class in April and hold graduation ceremonies in March; like spring, they represent renewal and rebirth. On Tuesday morning, in a school meeting hall in the tsunami-ravaged seaport of Kesennuma, it became something else: an act of defiance. The NYT reports.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    It was truly a trial by fire — one that has now become part of Russia’s nuclear marketing message.  How Chernobyl made Russia the most safety-conscious nuclear proponent. The NYT reports.

  • Heavy-machinery company Deere still sees itself doubling in size over the next eight years, due in large part to construction and agriculture in Asia, the corporation’s CEO, Samuel Allen, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    The G7 intervened to weaken the Yen last Friday in an attempt to stabilize the Japanese currency’s dramatic rise since the catastrophic earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. Europe’s central banks, the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Canada followed the Bank of Japan’s Yen sales, pushing it down against the US dollar.

  • Natural Gas

    Natural gas may be having its day, as its rival energy sources come under a cloud. The serious problems at the nuclear power plant in Japan have raised new doubts about the safety of nuclear energy the New York Times reports.

  • Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • Tiffany Gift Box

    Tiffany is reducing its first-quarter earnings forecast as it deals with some store closings and limited hours in Japan, in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami there.

  • 80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • buffett_quick_korea2011_200.jpg

    The Japanese disaster may speed improvement in relations between South Korea and Japan, the mayor of South Korea's third largest city told Warren Buffett today.

  • Customers buy fish on sale at a stall during the new year's first auction at the Tsukiji fish market on January 5, 2010 in Tokyo, Japan. The market handles approx 2,888 tons of fish a day generating over 2.8 billion yen.

    Japan’s list of casualties, already long, could soon include two of the country’s iconic brands: sushi and Kobe beef. The NYT reports.

  • Warren Buffett

    The nuclear disaster in Japan is likely to have major effects on US energy policy, according to billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

  • Dollars and Yen

    The G-7's intervention has halted the yen's rise, but what happens next isn't clear. Here's how to trade.

  • Hollywood sign

    Despite the upheaval roiling the markets, Wall Street analysts continue to issue upbeat reports about media companies, and even the negative reports don't mention the headlines — they simply don't have the exposure to Japan and the rest of the market instability as many other sectors.

  • charts_money_140.jpg

    Terrible weather in January, a spike in gasoline prices in February and a devastating earthquake in Japan in March: any of those three factors can bring a hiccup in earnings and taken together it seems more likely than not that they will.

  • Yen

    In the wake of the crisis in Japan, the yen has strengthened dramatically, which is counterintuitive. Usually, when a country's economy is expected to weaken, so does its currency, but  Japan is a unique case.

  • Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    There is no way to underscore the depth of the tragedy we see playing out before us as the potential of a nuclear nightmare of unprecedented proportions unfolds before our eyes. And while it pales in comparison to the human toll, the Japanese economy is also surely facing a period of great challenge.

  • 2011 Honda Odyssey

    In the depths of a panic-driven stocks sell-off this week, an options investor was making a big bullish bet on Japanese automaker Honda Motor .

  • Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

  • The yen is settling into a range after coordinated intervention by G-7 countries, but there's plenty of excitement elsewhere — it's time for your FX Fix.