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  • BOE_night3_200.jpg

    A central banker need not be loved, but at the least he should command respect — and in Britain these days Mervyn King cannot count on either, reports the New York Times.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    Employers in many sectors of the German economy are facing labor shortages, under the dual pressures of an aging population and inflation-fighting measures that have kept wages low in comparison with its neighbors.  The NYT reports.

  • egypt_protests_020211_240.jpg

    As protests continued for a 12th day, Egypt's newly named vice president and other top military leaders were discussing steps to limit President Mubarak’s decision-making authority and possibly remove him from the presidential palace in Cairo, the NYT reports.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    When the heads of the EU meet in Brussels on Friday, they will hear new ideas on how to save the euro, delivered by Mrs. Merkel and the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, but written largely in Berlin, reports the New York Times.

  • Egyptian demonstrators shout slogans next to burning police vehicles in Cairo on January 28, 2011.

    Some accuse the Mubarak government of deliberately fanning class tensions to create demands for the restoration of its brutal security state. But such resentments have built up here for nearly a decade. The NYT reports.

  • Everyone gets the same color badge chain. But badge colors highlight the WEF caste system.

    Chief executives, government leaders and academics around the world are headed to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting this week — a heady power gathering that mixes business, politics and Champagne in the Swiss Alps.

  • european_union_cracked_200.jpg

    At least for this year, the euro zone will remain united  and no country is likely to default, analysts told CNBC.com. But debt restructuring is on the horizon for later.

  • european_union_200.jpg

    New EFSF bonds are expected to be priced by investors with a yield 70 basis points above the German sovereign bond.

  • euros_dollars_200.jpg

    Expanding the EFSF is not the right solution, said Andreas Treichl, the CEO of Erste Bank, the Austrian-based bank focused on lending in Eastern Europe. Treichl added that one way or another, Germany will ultimately end up picking up the bill.

  • Bob Dudley, the Executive Director of BP, arrives at their headquarters in St James's Square on July 26, 2010 in London, England.

    Bob Dudley dismissed suggestions that the Russian deal would impact BP’s ability to meet its obligations in the US or be blocked by US lawmakers.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Less than a month after bailing out Ireland, and after a holiday lull in the markets that may have looked mistakenly like calming, the European Union is again struggling to persuade investors that it has the cash and the will to address the root cause of its travails. The New York Times reports.

  • Austerity measures put in place by peripheral euro zone countries will eventually bear fruit, but going forward bond investors will have to start getting used to taking losses on their principal, Erik Nielsen, the Chief European Economist at Goldman Sachs, told CNBC Friday.

  • european_union_crack2_200.jpg

    Greece has become the world's riskiest borrower in the fourth quarter of 2010, surpassing Venezuela, while Spain, Portugal and Ireland were riskier than Iraq.

  • The global economic recovery may be firmly on track, but Arjuna Mahendran, head of investment strategy for Asia at HSBC Private Bank, recommends that  investors  safe guard their portfolios against two central risks this year: inflation and the burgeoning government deficits.

  • Estonia

    On Saturday, Estonia completes its trip from Soviet republic to full-fledged member of the euro zone, reports the New York Times.

  • The Spasskaya Tower in Red Square, Moscow.

    As Russia moves to lure foreign investors, some strategists see the Russian bear as the emerging market bull for 2011.

  • lisbon portugal

    The euro once meant flush banks and easy credit, but these days it has laid bare a cold reality: Portugal shares the high wages and prices of richer northern European neighbors, but not their competitiveness, reports the New York Times.

  • NY Stock Exchange Traders

    While the market pullback isn't even in the realm of a correction, worries that Europe's debt crisis could  hurt the global economy are weighing on what otherwise could be a robust rally.

  • Spain

    Any bailout of Spain could severely stress the ability of Europe’s stronger countries to help the financially weaker ones, and spell deep trouble for the euro. The New York Times reports.

  • Paris goes green!

    The road into town is a potholed track, passing villages of log cabins and fallow fields that speak to the poverty that has gripped this part of central Russia for as long as anyone can remember. The New York Times reports.