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Europe News Eastern Europe

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    For years, Anissa Benchamacha bought her meat in a parking lot, from vendors hawking near-expired products to Muslims eager to find food that met their religious requirements.

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    "No actor, no product, no sector, no territory should no longer be able to escape sensible and intelligent regulation and supervision," Michel Barnier, the EU Commissioner for financial services, warned in an interview with CNBC.

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    The world’s most developed economies, which have been racking up spending since the mid-1960s, face record levels of debt as a result of the 2008-9 financial crisis and have little room for maneuver, the International Monetary Fund warned on Wednesday. The New York Times reports.

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    Struggling to reduce traffic jams and a high crime rate, Maastricht is pushing to make its legalized use of recreational drugs a Dutch-only policy, banning sales to foreigners who cross the border to indulge.

  • Stonehenge, England

    The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge stands tall in the British countryside as one of the last remnants of the Neolithic Age. Recently it has also become the latest symbol of another era: the new fiscal austerity. The NYT reports.

  • The Spasskaya Tower in Red Square, Moscow.

    Russia's reputation as a dangerous country for investors actually gives foreigners brave enough to invest there an advantage, Jochen Wermuth, CIO of Wermuth Asset Management, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    In many smart-money circles, listening to bears has become fashionable, the NY Times reports.

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    “The rise has gone unnoticed because all the attention was on wheat,” Abdolreza Abbassian, senior grain economist at the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome, told the Financial Times.

  • Budapest, Hungary

    The governor of the Hungarian Central Bank has it worse than most. Not only has the new government placed the blame on him, among others, for Hungary's stagnant economy, it has slashed his salary by 75 percent. The NYT reports.

  • Map of Europe

    A week after the authorities released results of stress tests on the largest European banks, market data is starting to provide an indication of whether the exercise had the desired effect on confidence. The answer: sort of. The NYT explains.

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    "They have a huge informal economy. Informal economies don't pay taxes but people eventually show up as they get older looking for pension and looking for health care," Edward Hugh, nicknamed "Europe's prophet of doom," told CNBC.

  • The financial crisis might have sapped Europe's growth for a long time, and there are fears that the slowdown is permanent, Polish central bank governor Marek Belka told TVN CNBC Tuesday.

  • Japan is vulnerable to a sovereign debt crisis in five to 10 years from now, warned Kenneth Rogoff, former chief economist the International Monetary Fund.

  • One energy name gets an upgrade and the analyst who made the call explains why he likes this space.

  • Russia

    One of the major topics of conversation at the just-concluded economic forum in St. Petersburg, Russia, was energy, specifically oil and the situation in the Gulf. That’s not surprising, as Russia is very rich in oil, natural gas and other commodities.

  • Estonia

    Guess what? The funniest thing happened in Europe on Thursday. A new country joined (yes, joined) the euro zone. And the mood here was upbeat. Estonia will begin using the euro on Jan. 1.

  • Cramer lists the stocks with “jaw-droppingly low valuations.”

  • The market had plenty of reasons to rally but the bulls just couldn’t keep it together and by the close the Dow surrendered a triple digit gain.

  • Cramer identifies some of the best high-yielding stocks at discount prices.

  • A weak jobs report hobbled the US’ ability to counterbalance the Continent’s debt troubles. Now investors must keep an even closer watch on the EU.