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Europe News Eastern Europe

  • Budapest, Hungary

    Growth in Central and Eastern Europe hinges on developments in the euro zone and a slowdown in the CEE region is already underway, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) chief economist Erik Berglof told CNBC on Wednesday.

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    Hedge funds have been known to use hardball tactics to make money. Now they have come up with a new one: suing Greece in a human rights court to make good on its bond payments.

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    Investors are bracing for a return to volatility when markets in the United States reopen on Tuesday, the New York Times reports.

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    As Europe’s debt turmoil enters its third year, no clear solutions are yet in sight — despite recent signs that a new lending program by the European Central Bank might be easing pressures.

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    As difficult as the last two years have been for Europe, 2012 could be even tougher. Each week, countries will need to sell billions of dollars of bonds — a staggering $1 trillion in total — to replace existing debt and cover their current budget deficits, the New York Times reports.

  • As talks between Hungary and its international creditors heat up, sharp European Union criticism of the country's lack of progress in tackling its high budget deficit added to pressure on Hungarian negotiators, who already seemed to be softening their tough stance.

  • A Hungarian delegation prepares to resume talks with the International Monetary Fund this week, hoping to secure a credit lifeline while investors continue to push up the country’s borrowing costs.

  • Budapest, Hungary

    Hungary's economy is approaching "meltdown," analysts warn, adding another financial crisis within Europe and raising concerns about more extreme populist moods gaining ground. The Christian Science Monitor reports.

  • Hungary 'a Good Investment'?

    There is a lot of negativity priced into Hungary, whereas Poland is considered the "darling" of Central and Eastern Europe, Bartosz Pawlowski Emerging Market Strategist at Barclays Wealth Management, said. "Before the month ends we're going to have more clarity and it's going to be a good investment," he said.

  • Hungary

    Fitch became the third ratings agency to downgrade Hungary's debt to "junk" status on Friday, invoking further deterioration in the country's fiscal and external financing and growth outlook and the government's "unorthodox" economic policies.

  • Vladamir Putin

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has a vision for a Soviet Union-lite he hopes will become a new Moscow-led global powerhouse. But, his planned Eurasian Union won't be grounded in ideology: This time it's about trade.

  • European Central Bank

    Stung by souring loans and troubled government bond portfolios, many European banks are being forced by regulators to raise money to build up their cash cushions against future losses.

  • Europe Is Still a 'Cash Cow': Heineken CEO

    Jean-Francois van Boxmeer, Chairman & CEO of Heineken, says the company is still generating solid profits from its Europe business despite the economic turbulence.

  • Manhattan skyline

    Hold the condolence cards, but the recession cost the rich. The share of income received by the top 1 percent — that potent symbol of inequality — dropped to 17 percent in 2009 from 23 percent in 2007, according to federal tax data. The New York Times reports.

  • Vladimir Putin

    Russian stocks and the rouble held above their two-week lows, but analysts said that, at least until Dec. 24, investors would be better off staying away from Russia.

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    Latvia's largest bank is scrambling to contain a run among depositors gripped by fears of the bank's imminent collapse.

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    As the European debt crisis roils the markets, American traders who once awoke at dawn are now rising in the dead of night to gain an edge when business begins in London, Paris and Frankfurt, the New York Times reports.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel and US President Barack Obama talk ahead of the start of the G20 Summit of Heads of State and Government on November 3, 2011 in Cannes, France.

    The latest response to the euro crisis sparks a debate  over  how far governments must bend to the power of markets, The New York Times reports.

  • Angela Merkel and Nicolas Sarkozy

    In the fiscal accord, the nations that use the euro essentially agreed to go back to Plan A — that is, the principles and rules with which they created their common currency two decades ago.

  • Financials Lead Friday Rally

    There was a little progress to celebrate in Europe but that doesn't mean the end of volatility, says Hank Smith, chief investment officer, Haverford Investments. With Clem Chambers, CEO of ADVFN.