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Europe News Eastern Europe

  • UNSPECIFIED - FEBRUARY 07: Cathedral in a city, St. Martin's Cathedral, Bratislava, Slovakia (Photo by DEA / W.BUSS/De Agostini/Getty Images)

    The prospect of guaranteeing the debt of richer but more spendthrift countries like Greece, Portugal and even Italy has led to public outrage in tiny Slovakia, the second-poorest country in the euro zone where the average worker earns just over $1,000 a month.  Now it is threatening to derail a collective European bailout . The New York Times reports.

  • Euro Will Get Worse Before it Improves?

    More uncertainty remains for the euro. "Looking into the fourth quarter, there is significant downward pressure," says Jens Nordvig, global head of G-10 currency strategy at Nomura Holdings . "We could be testing the lows from 2010."

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    With only two countries apart from Slovakia left to approve the extension of the euro zone's bailout fund, all eyes are on the Eastern European nation of around 5 million people who are not keen on helping richer Greece. 

  • European Central Bank

    Slovakia's parliament may vote on the expansion of the euro zone's bailout fund as soon as mid October, but the risk of a Greek default is still possible, Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radicova told CNBC in an interview in Bratislava.

  • US Debt Clock

    Like Americans trying to raise quick cash by unloading their unwanted goods, the federal government is considering a novel way to reduce the deficit: holding the equivalent of a garage sale, reports the NY Times.

  • Castle Square in Warsaw old town, 30th July 2010. (Photo by Luis Davilla/Cover/Getty Images)

    Concerns over investment in Central and Eastern Europe have grown as a solution to the problem of sovereign debt in the peripheral euro zone has eluded policymakers and global growth has slowed.

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    LONDON—Greece may never be able to pay off its huge debts, but its bonds, long scorned by investors, are suddenly being gobbled up by hedge funds. After a number of investors struck gold by betting against French banks, many have turned their attention to the hot yet risky euro zone trade of the moment: buying Greek government bonds that traders say are changing hands for as little as 36 cents for each euro of face value.

  • Budapest, Hungary

    Hungary's decision to help its citizens pay back the foreign exchange loans they took at the height of the economic boom a few years back has sparked outrage among banks and spooked foreign investors.

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    Two men who worked on the hit movie “Black Swan” have mounted an unusual challenge to the film industry’s widely accepted practice of unpaid internships by filing a lawsuit on Wednesday asserting that the production company had violated minimum wage and overtime laws by hiring dozens of such interns. The NYT reports.

  • greece_flag_cracked_200.jpg

    Greece may never be able to pay off its huge debts, but its bonds, long scorned by investors, are suddenly being gobbled up by hedge funds, the New York Times reports.

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    Hungary's government is taking steps to pull the country out of the difficult economic conditions it still faces but needs to ensure predictability, Eleni Tsakopoulos Kounalakis, US Ambassador to Hungary, told CNBC.com.

  • Hungary

    Since it was elected last year, Hungary's government has aggressively aimed to cut the country's debt burden, through raising taxes and nationalizing private pension assets, amongst other measures.

  • Emerging Market Opportunities

    The correction in markets around the world have given us the opportunity to pick up stocks that we wanted to in the past that were too expensive, says Mark Mobius, Templeton Emerging Markets Group executive chairman.

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    I've been to three European countries in three days and have not seen one newspaper headline on Greece, or the debt crisis. In fact, the topic when raised elicits yawns.

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    Fear of another downturn in the world economy lurks behind the smiles and relaxed atmosphere; the Czech Republic is heavily reliant on exports to the euro zone, especially Germany, for its economic growth.

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    Martin Tlapa, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic told CNBC.com in an interview in Prague that the "safe haven" label looks rather scary for a small, open economy that needs a stable exchange rate to function properly.

  • Czech Republic: Investment Opportunity?

    Miroslav Singer, Governor of the Czech National Bank, joined CNBC to discuss the Czech Republic's economic prospects.

  • A tramway pass in the center of Warsaw on June 8, 2011. Poland and Ukraine will co-host the 2012 European Football Championship.

    Analysts are skeptical now that the euro would be such a good idea, even if ordinary Poles are still optimistic.

  • Warsaw's Castle Square

    Some analysts have dubbed Central and Eastern Europe a safe haven – due to relatively low risk, because the countries have reformed, and relatively high yields, as they are still seen as emerging markets – but the risks are increasing.

  • A tramway pass in the center of Warsaw on June 8, 2011. Poland and Ukraine will co-host the 2012 European Football Championship.

    Analysts are skeptical now that the euro would be such a good idea, even if ordinary Poles are still optimistic.