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Europe News Eastern Europe

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    Europe's biggest states recognised the independence of Kosovo on Monday, ending hours of suspense after Prime Minister Hashim Thaci assured his new republic that Western recognition would come "any minute".

  • The Romanian unit of France's Societe Generale, BRD, said it thwarted an attempt by a clerk to steal 8 million lei ($3.19 million) this week, managing to block a large part of the transfer.

  • The economy's so bad, Cramer says, they have no choice.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

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    India's lucrative outsourcing industry struggled Thursday to overcome Internet slowdowns and outages after cuts in two undersea cables sliced the country's bandwidth in half.

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    It will take at least a year to assess the impact that the fallout of the U.S. subprime crisis has on the European banking sector, but investors can bottom fish for some good opportunities, analysts said on Monday.

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    The Austrian capital is the city where the old EU meets the new EU. Teeming with international organizations, it's also the city that was the first to foray into Eastern European banking and the destination for tasty pastry.

  • It's that time of the year again, when Germany's trade unions traditionally put their wage demands on the table for the opening rounds of the annual ritual that is called "collective wage bargaining". And, with the economy growing at a robust pace still and with corporate profits on the rise, the voice of the unions is getting louder again. We've already had some taste of strike this season. Is there more to come?

  • Tata Nano

    We won't see it here in the states anytime soon and there are still plenty of questions about how much of a market there is for this pint size car. Still, the new Nano by Tata is getting big buzz. The company unveiled the car yesterday in India, and since its reveal I've been inundated with questions from other bloggers...

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    An evocative smell from childhood can quickly trigger the realization that cost cutting is not a strategy, but a reaction that, without corresponding investment, will doom industries.

  • With the benefit of 20/20 hindsight we turn our attention to some of the big predictions of 2007 and whether investors might have been better off just rolling the bones.

  • Yugo

    For sale: Auto company with a colorful, if unspectacular, track record. Located in the fast-growing Eastern Europe market, with plenty of capacity for building new models. The prize property on the block? Yugo! Yes, that Yugo!

  • Buenos Aires

    Western Europe has long been the most popular getaway for U.S. tourists, but rising airfare and the weak dollar may have Americans traveling to more exotic destinations in 2008.

  • Smart Car

    With Detroit and much of the auto industry shut down this week and gearing up for the Detroit Auto Show next month, I thought it would be a good time to take a few minutes and share my Christmas wishes for the auto world. I hope Santa brings you everything you want.

  • Instead of beating the drum for the greatness of the single European currency, the last missive was a demand for European companies to quit blaming the strong euro for what are their own mistakes. But some readers took umbrage.

  • Hedge wise and sleep well. Or, as they say in German: Gut gehedged ist halb gewonnen! Silvia Wadhwa gives her take on the single currency.

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    As we close out this year, I know some of you are asking, "Hey Toyota Phil (a nickname a friend gave me after accusing me of giving the Japanese automaker too much praise) what do you think will happen in the auto industry next year?" Well, since you asked, and I know some of you haven't asked, here are my prognostications for 2008.

  • Silvia Wadhwa

    The same banks that demanded market forces be allowed to work in other indutries are now begging central banks for help.

  • Silvia Wadhwa

    "Drat!" you say. "Yawn! Not more morning notes. Not another string with market pearls of wisdom I might have to read."Fear not! I threaten you only with idle thoughts and random contemplations from the other side of the Big Pond (from beyond the Channel even). In other words, from parts of the world where a Hamburger doesn't necessarily come as a snack between two bits of a soggy roll, where a Frankfurter might well eat a wiener, and where cars -- oh, bliss! -- generally have a stick shift and a clutch!It's also from a part of the world -- eat your heart out, friends from the British Isles -- where you can travel from country to country without ever showing your passport and, more to the point, never have to change your money.OK, that also means the land where battalions of politicians argue passionately over the size, color and bending-angle (seriously!) of bananas, about what exactly passes for a standard-size €uro condom and acceptable work practices for a €uro chimney sweep. If that doesn't justify the title of this blog -- €urocentric -- then I don't know what does.

  • The Austrian running the world's largest food group talks about trust and the need to delegate in order for an organisation of Nestle's complexity to succeed. Peter Brabeck also hits back at critics of his decision to take the dual mandate of Chairman and CEO, whilst rebuffing journalists who write he's chosen the wrong candidate to succeed him as CEO.

  • The father of private equity in Europe, and 'bankroller' of UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown within his Labour Party, talks passionately to Simon Hobbs about what it really takes to be an entrepreneur and why society may explode in violence if the private sector does not do more.