Economy

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  • Nashville, Tennessee

    Whether you'd really consider retiring to North Dakota or West Virginia, this unconventional list will at least get you thinking about what you really need from a retirement spot.

  • The number of homeowners falling behind on their mortgages for the first time has finally fallen close to pre-housing-crisis levels. That's the good news.

  • A Netjets Inc. sign stands hear a new Embraer Phenom 300 jet at Eppley Airfield in Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.

    As the U.S. economy recovers, Berkshire Hathaway-owned NetJets has seen a surge in new customers and current owners flying more hours, NetJets CEO Jordan Hansell and Warren Buffett told CNBC.

  • Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange before the closing bell May 6, 2010. The Dow plunged almost 1,000 points before closing down 347 on Greek debt fears.

    Rather than being simply a one-off event that Wall Street could dismiss as an aberration, the Flash Crash now looks like it was just the first warning shot.

  • Warren Buffett

    Warren Buffett tells CNBC's Becky Quick stocks will be going a "lot higher" in her lifetime but warns investors to stay away from bonds.

  • Millennials are more cautious about investing in the market than their parents. But they are also more knowledgeable about what to do with their money.

  • Warren Buffett at the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder's Meeting in Omaha, Nebraska.

    Warren Buffett said it will be "the shot heard around the world" when the Fed indicates it will stop buying financial assets or start selling from their now enormous $3.4 trillion balance sheet.

  • Charlie Munger, Vice-Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Corporation

    The events in Europe are a great example of bankers gone wild and you simply can't trust them, said Charlie Munger.

  • Advocates on both sides of the aisle want to lower the official corporate tax rate and the country's biggest companies are in favor, but how? NYT reports.

  • Full-time and part-time openings at a restaurant.

    Companies will add more part-time jobs to avoid Obamacare's rule to provide health care benefits for full-time workers, say critics. In April, 278,000 part-time jobs were created.

  • Stronger housing means more jobs. When they feel more financially comfortable that comfort sends them out spending.

  • Job seekers wait in line to meet with employers at the 25th Annual CUNY big Apple Job and Internship Fair at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City.

    Near-term deceleration will probably give way to strengthening next year, Goldman Chief Economist Jan Hatzius told "Squawk on the Street."

  • A better-than-expected jobs report sent stocks soaring into record territory, relieving worst fears about the economy but still signaling that job growth has slowed.

  • A waitress at Langer's Delicatessen in Los Angeles.

    The pace of growth in the vast U.S. services sector slowed in April to its weakest pace in nine months, an industry report showed on Friday.

  • Job creation accelerated in April, with the U.S. economy adding 165,000 new positions and the unemployment rate edging lower amid worries over a spring slowdown.

  • The euro zone economy will shrink by 0.4 percent this year and grow 1.2 percent next year, the European Commission said on Friday, but the recovery is expected to be too slow to reduce joblessness.

  • The euro jumped against the dollar after ECB Governing Council Member Ewald Nowotny told CNBC on Friday that the markets over-interpreted Mario Draghi's comments on negative deposit rates.

  • Gartman: I Was Wrong, But Still Staying Out of Stocks

    Dennis Gartman, founder and editor of the Gartman Letter, believes the new Affordable Care Act (ACA) could be a key reason why businesses are reluctant to hire new workers.

  • Expansion in China's services sector slowed in April, in line with slower factory activity and reinforcing views that recovery in the world's second-largest economy remains modest.

  • Penny Pritzker

    President Obama chooses longtime fundraiser Penny Pritzker as Commerce secretary and adviser Michael Froman as U.S. Trade Representative.

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