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Business Egypt

  • As the retail sales numbers go tomorrow, so will go the dollar.

  • Hurting in the Middle Eastern sense means being shot. Watch the armies. If, as in Egypt, they refuse to fire on the people, the leader is toast.

  • President Barack Obama News Conference

    The administration is searching for an acceptable blend of government support and a pro business environment because voters demand better jobs without compromising the nation’s balance sheet. The answer may be in Tripoli.

  • A youth with an Egyptian flag painted on his face stands in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

    The global financial markets are beginning to show signs of distress and volatility after an exceptional strong rally in US equities and global risk.

  • Supporters of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi hold his pictures as they take part in a pro-government rally in Tripoli on February 17, 2011 as the country faced a nationwide "Day of Anger" called by opposition cyber activists.

    Fears that Libya is heading toward deepening chaos hit stocks Monday and pushed oil prices sharply higher.

  • Supporters of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi hold his pictures as they take part in a pro-government rally in Tripoli on February 17, 2011 as the country faced a nationwide "Day of Anger" called by opposition cyber activists.

    Clashes in oil producer Libya sent benchmark Brent crude to 2-1/2-year highs on Monday above $105 a barrel on fears that supplies to Western countries could be disrupted, while U.S. prices rallied by more than $4.

  • China_marching_200.jpg

    Jittery Chinese authorities wary of any domestic dissent staged a show of force Sunday to squelch a mysterious online call for a "Jasmine Revolution," with only a handful of people joining protests apparently modeled on the pro-democracy demonstrations sweeping the Middle East.

  • saudi_oil_200.jpg

    With the recent turmoil across North Africa and the Gulf, investors are now becoming increasingly concerned that the ‘political contagion,’ as the wave of upheaval has come to be known, may flow over into Saudi Arabia as well.

  • NYSE trader

    The S&P is now up 6.8 percent for the year, and analysts and traders keep watching for the pullback that just doesn't seem to come. Turmoil in the Middle East, recurring sovereign debt concerns in Europe and now the idea of inflation all hang over markets.

  • What's Fueling Oil's Wild Disconnect?

    Discussing the unrest in Bahrain and some momentum plays in oil, with John Kilduff, Again Capital; Daniel Dicker, independent oil trader/TheStreet.com and CNBC's Yousef Gamal El Din.

  • Egyptian anti-government protesters celebrate at Cairo's Tahrir Square after president Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

    If Saudi Arabia begins to appears vulnerable, in the least, to publicly expressed internal discontent, $100 oil will look cheap in a hurry!

  • A poster placed on a lamp post calls for the return of the internet after it was shut down by the government on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    Epitaphs for the Mubarak government all note that the mobilizing power of the Internet was one of the Egyptian opposition’s most potent weapons. But quickly lost in the swirl of revolution was the government’s ferocious counterattack, a dark achievement that many had thought impossible in the age of global connectedness. The New York Times reports.

  • Cyberactivist Wael Ghonim speaks with the press at Cairo's Tahrir square after his release.

    Wael Ghonim has officially “taken a leave” from his position at Google according to Google spokesperson, Jennifer Bloch.

  • Egyptians pose for photos atop by an Egyptian army tank in Cairo, Egypt. Two days after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian army is asserting its control and has dissolved the parliament and is suspending the constitution, meeting two key demands of pro-democracy protesters.

    With the resignation of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, we now enter the dangerous “Thermidor” phase of the historic socio-political revolution begun in North Africa and Egypt, a revolt that is energizing citizens – especially young citizens – in other autocratic nations as well.

  • Egyptians pose for photos atop by an Egyptian army tank in Cairo, Egypt. Two days after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian army is asserting its control and has dissolved the parliament and is suspending the constitution, meeting two key demands of pro-democracy protesters.

    Egypt's military rulers called for an end to strikes and protests Monday as thousands of state employees, from ambulance drivers to police and transport workers, demonstrated to demand better pay in a growing wave of labor unrest unleashed by the democracy uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak's regime.

  • Man carrying Facebook sign, reading "Thank you youth of Egypt" and "We are holding our ground.  We are not going to leave" at bottom.

    A two-year collaboration of dissidents gave birth to a new force — a pan-Arab youth movement dedicated to spreading democracy in a region without it, the New York Times reports.

  • wall_street_bull_snow_200.jpg

    The stock market's easy glide higher could continue in the week ahead, as its steady advance draws in fresh money. But investors will continue to watch for signs of a pullback, now that the market is up nearly 6 percent since the start of the year.

  • Middle East Turmoil

    Stocks ended higher Friday after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned in response to demonstrations against his rule, helping lift investor sentiment and uncertainties surrounding the country. 

  • Middle East Turmoil

    Stocks were poised to close the session higher Friday after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned in response to demonstrations against his rule, helping lift investor sentiment and uncertainties surrounding the country. 

  • Egyptian anti-government protesters celebrate at Cairo's Tahrir Square after president Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

    A furious wave of protest finally swept Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak from power on Friday after 30 years of one-man rule, sparking jubilation on the streets and sending a warning to autocrats across the Arab world and beyond.