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CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Ella Zhang

Special to CNBC

Ella Zhang is completing a master's degree in business and economic reporting at New York University. She holds a bachelor's degree in Chinese language and literature, and a double degree in economics.

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  • During the decade-long period of healing, people in towns across America have been erecting memorials to the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 terror attacks. There are some 500 recorded memorials in the U.S. and more are underway or planned. Most of them are in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Connecticut, home to the majority of the victims. Others are hundreds of miles away, such as one in North Dakota. The memorials vary widely in size, design and cost. Some are public, others private.

    During the decade-long period of healing, people in towns across America have been erecting memorials to the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 terror attacks. Click to see the photos.

  • Hummel's Wharf

    After ten years, memorials are still being built around the country on top of the 700 already in place. Each of them marks a unique healing path for the victim's family, the  community and the whole nation.

  • beijing_HandM_customers_200.jpg

    This may come as a surprise: Chinese consumers are often more willing to drop a huge chunk of money on fashion—especially Western brands—than consumers in the US and Europe. This offers a huge opportunity for retailers as China's fashion industry is set to become the world’s second fashion market, and account for about 30 percent of the global fashion market’s growth over the next five years, according to a recent report from Boston Consulting Group.

  • jcrew_chinese_factory2_200.jpg

    Apparel from Chinese factories is increasingly slipping into the hands of Chinese consumers, who purchase the items at a significant discount from independent sellers on websites like Taobao.com and Chinese eBay. Even shoppers in the US can get in on the deals.

  • Florida_home_200.jpg

    More Americans are renting out their vacation homes, either because they can't sell them or are unwilling to sell for a loss.  That has flooded  the vacation rental market, keeping rates low and offering Americans a wide choice for this summer.